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Transferring Credits to USU

Utah State University awards transfer credit for academic work completed at other academic institutions. Transfer and articulation is not based solely on the accreditation status of the transfer institution. For complete details on transferring credits to Utah State University, please visit the USU Registrar's website where you will also find contact information for the articulation office.

USU-Online Courses Recently Offered

Not all courses are available every semester. Courses may be add/removed from this list from term to term and at anytime. This list does not guarantee the availability of courses. If you wish to search for a particular course by semester, please visit https://rcde.usu.edu/coursesearch/.

Click on a row for details about a particular course.Pressing enter or spacebar on a selected row will reveal the course description on the following row.
CourseTitleCredits
ACCT 2010FINANCIAL ACCT PRINCIPLES3.0
Survey of uses of accounting information by investors and creditors for decision making. Emphasis on basic accounting principles used to prepare, analyze, and interpret financial statements. Prerequisite/Restriction: GPA of 2.5 or higher. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ACCT 2020MANAGERIAL ACCT PRINCIPLES3.0
Survey of uses of accounting information by managers for decision making, including planning, budgeting, and controlling operations. Emphasizes accumulation, analysis, and control of product and service costs. Prerequisite/Restriction: ACCT 2010 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ADVS 2010COMPANION ANIMAL SCI/MGT3.0
Principles of the care and management of companion (dog and cat) and exotic animals, including breeds, anatomy, physiology, behavior, nutrition, infectious diseases, parasites and animal welfare issues.
ANTH 1010CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (BSS)3.0
Role of cultural concepts within discipline of anthropology. Relationship of cultural concepts to survival and adaptation, society and social life, ideology and symbolism, and cultural change and diversity. Applications to contemporary world problems. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring (Fall, Spring, Summer online)
ANTH 1020BIOLOGICAL ANTH (BLS)3.0
Survey of multidisciplinary field of biological anthropology. Includes study of fossil and living primates, fossil evidence for human evolution, bioarchaeology, contemporary human variation and adaptation, principles of evolutionary theory, and introductory population genetics. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ANTH 1099RESOURCES IN ANTH AT USU1.0
Familiarizes incoming freshmen, new majors, and transfer students with the academic resources available to Anthropology students at USU. Covers program, department, library, college, campus, intercampus, and internet resources. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ANTH 2010PEOPLES OF THE WORLD (BSS)3.0
Introduces different ways of life, rural and urban, from the world's major culture areas. Focuses on how contemporary societies have evolved in ecological, historical, and political context. Introduces problems arising from third world social change. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
ANTH 2210INTRO TO FOLKLORE (BHU)3.0
Introduction to major genres of folklore (folk narrative, custom, folk music and song, vernacular architecture and arts), folk groups (regional, ethnic, occupational, familial), and basic folklore research method (collecting and archiving). Cross-listed as: ENGL 2210 and HIST 2210. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ANTH 3200PERSPECTIVES ON RACE (DSS)(CI)3.0
Study of the processes of racial differentiation, the basis of biological differences found among existing human groups, the influence of biology and culture on human variation, and the influence of social context on perceptions of race. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
ANTH 3550CULTURE OF EAST ASIA (DHA)3.0
Helps students explore and appreciate the culture of three East Asian countries: China, Japan and Korea. Students gain sincere view and understanding of these East Asian cultures through readings, hands-on cultural activities, viewing video materials, writing, and discussions. Topics include: major historical and social events, customs and traditions, thoughts and beliefs, people, food, contemporary issues, art, literature, and film. Cross-listed as: HIST 3550 and LANG 3550.
ANTH 3710TOPICS IN FOLKLORE (CI)3.0
Issues, problems, and methodologies in folklore study. Focus and instructor variable. Cross-listed as: HIST 3710 and RELS 3710 and ANTH 3710. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
APEC 2010INTRO MICROECONOMICS (BSS)3.0
Designed to build an understanding of the economics of the marketplace from the perspectives of individual consumer and producer or business. Development and application of microeconomic principles to demonstrate the role and limitations of competitive markets in motivating socially efficient consumer, business, and public sector choices. Prerequisite/Restriction: ECN 1500. Cross-listed as: ECN 2010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
APEC 3012INTRO TO NR/RGNL ECON (DSS)3.0
Introduction to economic principles as they apply to the use of natural resources and as they affect environmental quality. Analysis of changes in natural resource use and environmental quality, in order to determine the economic impact upon rural communities and regions. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
APEC 3310ANALYTICAL METHODS IN APEC(QI)3.0
Explores application of economic reasoning to logical and empirical problem solving in agricultural, resource, environmental, and regional economics. Topics include basic data analysis, graphical analysis, probability and expected value, basic numerical optimization, and linear regression. Prerequisite: MIS 2100 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
APEC 5010FIRM MKTG AND PRICE ANALYS(QI)3.0
This course focuses on the analysis of prices in food and agricultural markets. Emphasis is placed on empirical analysis. Includes institutional aspects of pricing, temporal and spatial price relationships, factors affecting the supply and demand of commodities, price forecasting, and the economic consequences of pricing decisions. Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to acquire tools, and become familiar with techniques and methods used by professional price analysts. Prerequisite/Restriction: APEC 3010 , APEC 3310 and ECN 3010 or APEC 4010 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
APEC 5015FIRM MGMT PLANNING AND OPT(QI)3.0
Application of principles and practices used by managers of agribusiness firms. Evaluation of alternative actions using budgeting (enterprise, cash flow, partial, whole firm, and capital) and optimization programs. Prerequisite/Restriction: ACCT 2020, APEC 3020 and APEC 3310 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ARBC 3030INTRO TO ISLAM (DHA)3.0
This course will focus on understanding Islam through the examination of what Muslim jurists, theologians, exegetes and traditionalists think of their own traditions. This course will focus on the core beliefs, practices, scriptures and sentiments that have defined historically Muslim communities. In addition, the course aims to examine the spiritual dimensions, the theological discourses and the legal maxims of the Muslim traditions. Cross-listed as: RELS 3030 and HIST 3030
ARTH 2710SURVEY OF WESTERN ART (BHU)3.0
Prehistoric art through the end of the Gothic era. Prerequisites/Restrictions: Art & Design Student Only or Permission of Instructor Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ASTE 3050TECH/PROF COMMUNICATION (CI)3.0
Technical communication principles and practices used in the workplace. Emphasizes technical writing of reports and correspondence using electronic information retrieval and presentation. Prerequisite/Restriction: Fulfillment of Communications Literacy CL2 requirement. Crosslist: JCOM 3050 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ASTE 3440SCI/TECH/MOD SOCIETY (DSC)3.0
Designed to challenge students from all academic majors to develop an understanding of the dynamic interaction between science, technology, and society. Explores responsibility of humans for directing the utilization of technology as a creative enterprise. Cross-listed as: ETE 3440. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ASTE 6090PROGRAM DESIGN3.0
Study of contemporary program design and development in technology and engineering education and career and technical education. Reviews complete curriculum developmental process. (F,Sp,Su) Cross List: TEE 6090
ASTE 6100RESEARCH METHODS IN AG SYS3.0
Introduces techniques used in applied agricultural research, as well as in career and technical education research. Includes research design, data gathering, and statistical analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 2800 or STAT 2000 or SOC 3120 or instructor approval Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
ASTE 6150EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT3.0
This course will provide an overview of the various methods used to measure and evaluate student achievement, within the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains. This course will review the principles of teaching and learning. Cross List: TEE 6150
ASTE 6160ADULT EDUCATION3.0
Addresses the context and providers of adult education. In addition, adult learning theories and participation models are examined. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
ASTE 6170PROGRAM PLANNING & EVALUATION3.0
Application of theory to program planning and evaluation in nonformal and formal environments. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Summer (Odd Years)
ASTE 6315CTSO Management3.0
Examines planning and supervising career exploration, experiential learning, and leadership development activities of secondary agriculture students and professional development of the secondary agriculture teacher.
ASTE 6350SAFETY AND RISK MANAGEMENT3.0
Major concepts associated with the development, enactment, and execution of policy of experiential learning programs. Focus will be on the examination and development of policy. This course provides students with an understanding of safety concepts, principles, and practices as they relate to risk management for extension.
ASTE 6380MENTORING AND SUPERVISION3.0
Explores the role of supervision and mentoring in the success of teaching professionals. Reviews four components of professional practice. Examines techniques for observation and conferencing. Students reflect upon their own teaching/mentoring exeriences and the impact upon professional practice. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
ASTE 6400FOOD, LAND AND PEOPLE1-3
Designed for pre-service (undergraduate, elementary education) or practicing, in-service (graduate) teachers. Offers development for infusing agriculture and the concepts of food, land, and people into existing curriculum standards and objectives. Presentation of agricultural-related instructional units, as well as research-based teaching strategies will be demonstrated. Cross-listed as: ASTE 5400. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
AV 3010NATL AIRSPACE/AIRPORT ADMIN3.0
Study of air traffic control system, airspace usage, and facilities. Airport planning, development, and management and their importance to the achievement of a successful airport operation. Management of publicly owned and operated airports, ranging in size from general aviation to the large air carrier hubs. Prerequisite/Restriction: Aviation Technology majors with 40 credit completed Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
AV 3120AVIATION LAW3.0
Law as it affects aviation industry. Rights and responsibilities of individual organizations and the aviation community. Regulation and liability pertaining to design, manufacturing, operation, and maintenance of aircraft. Prerequisite/Restriction: Aviation Technology majors with 40 credits completed. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
AV 4280AVIATION MANAGEMENT3.0
Study of airline operations and their organizational structure. Examines functions of airline dispatcher, operations specialists, managers, and cockpit flight crew. Discussion of advanced flight planning, aircraft performance and loading considerations, and impact of weather on flight operations and routing priorities. Prerequisite/Restriction: Aviation Technology majors with 40 credits completed. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
AV 6120AVIATION OPS AND MANAGEMENT3.0
This course introduces the student to business and corporate aviation management. Students will discover the many aspects of running a business in aviation, from determining the needs of the industry, getting started in determining business strategy, hiring personnel and purchasing aircraft. Topics will include operations, maintenance, safety, and how to put it all together in a company students will create as a class, by taking on the various required roles.
AV 6130AEROSPACE TECH & AUTOMATION3.0
Every pilot, instructor, crewmember, support crew, safety team, manager, commander, or even aviation enthusiast understands the need to understand the new glass cockpit, air traffic control facility, or operations center. The modern age has created many advancements that enhance but also detract from performance. This course explores nine principles that can be used for operating glass cockpit aircraft, and apply to technology in general in aviation. Semester Typically Taught: Summer
AV 6310AVIATION SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYS3.0
This course covers the foundation of a good safety program: the Safety Management Systems (SMS). The course begins with the history and evolution of safety, the principles of quality management, and then delves into the rigors of safety analysis. Topics will include hazards, risks, controls, and the tools and methods of analysis. Students will create a program for a Part 141 Flight School, and utilize taxonomies in our modern aviation system.
AV 6320AIRPORT AND GROUND SAFETY PROG3.0
This course gives aviation students a broad understanding of the ground safety program. Students will become familiar with hazardous material management, emergency planning, ground handling procedures and ground structure protection. Other topics will include the impact of weather on ground operations, ramp and cargo operations, fuel safety and how to collect, manage and analyze safety data.
AV 6340AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT INVEST3.0
Since the Wright Brothers first controlled, sustained, powered, heavier-than-air flight, and subsequent crash, analysis of why it happened has been a part of aviation. No safety minded aviation professional is unaware of the risks in aviation, and the lessons to be learned from accidents. This course will give a broad overview of the investigation process, not make accident investigators of the students. Using the actual text of the premier safety investigation courses, students will learn the techniques investigators use to discover how and why accidents occur. Semester Typically Taught: Summer
AV 6350AVIATION SECURITY3.0
This course introduces the student to the post 9-11 environment in aviation security. Students need to understand the importance of threat analysis, from the perimeter fence, to screening passengers and baggage, and to the overall infrastructure of airports. Students will gain an appreciation of the behind-the-scenes efforts that go unnoticed by the many passengers flying every day. Semester Typically Taught: Summer
BIOL 1010BIOL AND THE CITIZEN (BLS)3.0
Principles and methods of biology and how they impact the daily life and environment of the individual. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
BIOL 3010EVOLUTION (DSC)3.0
Origins and evidence for the theory of biological evolution, and its significance for society and science. Prerequisite/Restriction: University Studies Breadth Life Sciences (BLS) course. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
BIOL 3040PLANTS AND CIV (DSC)3.0
Examines the importance of plants as food, shelter, clothing, medicine, and drugs. Social and historical role of plants in aesthetics, religion, energy, biotechnology, human exploration, and migration. Prerequisite/Restriction: University Studies Breadth Life Sciences (BLS) course. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
CCA 3330ARTS SYMPOSIUM (DHA)2.0
Students attend a number of cultural events offered at USU and in the community, as well as write critiques of the events. Note: CCA 3330 may be applied to the depth requirements, but not to the breadth requirements. Two credits of CCA 3330 are needed to fulfill the DHA requirement. Prerequisite/Restriction: Completion of at least 30 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
CHEM 1010INTRO TO CHEMISTRY (BPS)3.0
For nonscience majors. Includes basic chemical concepts and a survey of the various branches of chemistry. Heavy emphasis on everyday applications to problems involving environmental pollution, radioactivity, energy sources, and human health. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
CHEM 1220PRIN OF CHEMISTRY II (BPS)4.0
Continuation of CHEM 1210 ; the second half of a two-semester sequence, covering the fundamentals of chemistry. Designed for science and engineering students. Prerequisite/Restriction: CHEM 1210 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
CHEM 2320ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II4.0
Continuation of CHEM 2310 . The second half of a two semester sequence covering the physical properties, nomenclature, stereochemistry, mechanisms, chemical reactivity, and spectroscopy of organic compounds, including the biological roles and importance of organic compounds. Upon completion, students will be prepared to understand the chemical aspects of biochemistry as they relate to how organic biomolecules react and interact in biological systems. Prerequisite/Restriction: CHEM 2310 or CHEM 2300 and permission of instructor. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
CHEM 3650ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (DSC)3.0
Survey of issues and chemical nature of environmental problems, including air, soil, and water pollution. Prerequisite: CHEM 1010 or 1120 or 1220. (Sp)
CHEM 3700INTRO BIOCHEMISTRY3.0
Brief survey of the chemistry of biologically important compounds and their role in microbial, animal, and plant metabolism. Prerequisite: CHEM 2300 or 2310. (Sp)
CHSS 2250INTRO INTERN/COOP1-5
Introductory-level educational work experience in an internship or cooperative education position approved by the department and/or the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Check with major department for limitations on number of credits that can be counted for graduation. Repeatable for credit Pass/Fail only. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
CHSS 4250ADV INTERNSHIP/COOP1-15
Internship or cooperative education position of a more professional level, with increased complexity, approved by the college. Repeatable for credit Pass/Fail only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
CLAS 1120LATIN/GREEK ELEMENT3.0
Survey of classical word roots in English, with a view to enhancing students? comprehension of English vocabulary and its Indo-European heritage. Cross list: HIST 1120 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
COMD 2400ORIENTATION AND OBSERVATION1.0
Introduces students to the professional responsibilities required of communicative disorders and deaf education specialists in a variety of employment settings. Observation of normal/abnormal communication abilities. Language, hearing, and speech disorders. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
COMD 2500LANG/SPEECH/HEAR DEV3.0
Language, speech, and hearing development throughout life and strategies for facilitating development. Requisites for human communication and language learning. Theoretical models of language acquisition and intracultural/intercultural differences. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
COMD 2600INTRO TO COMD2.0
Addresses undergraduate study of types of communication disorders existing across the lifespan. Includes characteristics, etiologies, and brief introduction to assessment and intervention practices. Also explores fields of speech language pathology and audiology. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
COMD 3010AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I (CI)4.0
Introduction to American Sign Language and Deaf Culture/History. Students learn extensive ASL vocabulary, phrases and grammatical principles that prepare them for the academic use of ASL to teach school subjects. Skills taught far exceed those required for social communication. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
COMD 3080ASL PRACTICE1.0
Provides opportunities for practice and continued improvement of receptive and expressive skills in American Sign Language. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
COMD 3100FUND ANATOMY SPEECH/LANG3.0
Basic study of the structures and functions associated with the subprocesses of speech and hearing, including respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, neurology, and hearing. Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the COMDDE major. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 3120DISORDERS ARTICULAT/PHONOLOGY3.0
Introduction to articulation and phonological disorders and related problems. Emphasis directed at evaluation, management, and measures of success. Principles of programming are presented. Prerequisites: Admission into the COMDDE degree.
COMD 3300INTRO BLIND/VISUAL IMPAIRMENT3.0
Explores learning characteristics and needs of children and youth (preschool through high school) who are blind or visually impaired, as well as educational settings they are in and professionals who serve them. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 3320HUMAN EYE AND VISUAL SYSTEM3.0
Covers structure and function of the human eye and visual system. Addresses the most common eye conditions causing visual impairment in children and youth, along with their implications and treatment. Explores the role of eye care specialists. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 3330INTRO TO LOW VISION3.0
Introduction to the needs of students having low vision. Methods of adapting materials, activities, and the environment to better meet the learning needs of these students. Includes training in the use of low-vision aids. Explores the role of professionals and their services. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 3340ROLE OF PARAEDUCATORS3.0
Addresses the roles and responsibilities of paraeducators who work in educational settings with children and youth who are blind or visually impaired. Covers the role of the educational team, as well as how the paraeducator functions as part of that team. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 3350INTRO MULTIPLE DISABILITIES3.0
Presents introductory information about various disabilities, including those associated with sensory losses. Covers neurological issues related to brain development and learning. Addresses communication issues and strategies for working with individuals having multiple disabilities and sensory loss. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 3360INTRO TO BRAILLE3.0
Introduction to braille literacy, as well as braille codes, software, and technology used to produce braille. Teaches students how to read and write uncontracted braille using a slate and stylus and a braille writer (actual or simulated). Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 3400ACOUSTICS/ANATOMY OF THE EAR3.0
Principles of physical acoustics as applied to Communicative Disorders. Course includes anatomy, physiology, and metabolism of the human auditory system. Prerequisites: Mimimum Grade of B- in COMD 2500 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
COMD 3500PHONETICS/PHONOLOGY3.0
Study of the development of the phonological subsystem in English and the acoustic and physiological characteristics of speech sounds. Prerequisite: Must be addmitted to the COMDDE major. (F)
COMD 3700BASIC AUDIOLOGY3.0
Study of pure tone audiometry, including clinical masking, speech audiometry, and clinical immittance measures. Laboratory exercises are required. Prerequisite: Minimum Grade of B- in COMD 3400. Must be admitted into the COMDDE major.
COMD 3910AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II4.0
Provides a more in-depth study of American Sign Language, Deaf folklore and literature, and the grammatical structure of ASL. Focuses on unique number systems, idioms, lexicalized fingerspelling, and ASL poetry. Course taught with a total immersion approach, with ample opportunities for practice with fluent users of ASL in the lab. Prerequisite: COMD 3010 with B- or higher, or instructor approval. (F, Sp, Su)
COMD 4250PRACTICUM IN DEAFBLINDNESS4.0
Provides practicum and work experience in serving children and youth having deaf-blindness or blindness. Assignments and projects vary, depending upon the student and the setting. Prerequisites: COMD 4660/6660 and COMD 4840/6840
COMD 4450PED DX AND TX IN COMD3.0
Designed to give students an introductory understanding of assessment and treatment procedures when working with the pediatric population having communicative disorders. Addresses multicultural considerations in assessment and treatment of communicative disorders. Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the COMDDE major Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
COMD 4660INTRO TO DEAF-BLINDNESS4.0
Covers combined vision and hearing loss, as well as its impact on learning, communication, and overall development. Also explores neurological issues and other senses. Cross-listed as: COMD 6660. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 4780SOCIO-CULTURE ASPECTS DEAF3.0
Leads students to understand how society, political institutions, and education have impacted the Deaf culture. Cross-listed as: COMD 6780. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
COMD 4840CHILD W VIS/HEAR/MD4.0
Designed to teach students how to implement appropriate intervention strategies for infants and young children (ages 0-3) related to communication, cognition, touch, play, self-care, orientation to the environment, etc., and how to help the family learn to communicate with their child. Prerequisite: COMD 4660/6660
COMD 4890ADD. ISSUES DEAFBLINDNESS4.0
This course will cover additional topics related to deafblindness including transition, health, mobility, and assesment. Graduate work requires an extra project. Prerequisite/Restriction: COMD 4660/COMD 6660 and COMD 4840/COMD 6840 Cross-listed as: COMD 6890 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 4910ASL III (CI)4.0
Basic concepts of linguistics of ASL discussed including an in depth analysis of ASL history, grammatical structure and ASL poetry. Application of linguistic principles with fluent ASL users via lab experience. Prerequisite/Restriction: B- or better in COMD 3910; or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as: COMD 6910. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
COMD 4920ASL IV4.0
This course explores practical applications of ASL including nonmanual behaviors and signing English concepts with conceptual accuracy. It will prepare students for the rigorous demands of mastering teaching of English through ASL. Prerequisite/Restriction: B- or better in COMD 4910; or permission of instructor. Cross-listed as: COMD 6920. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
COMD 5070SPEECH SCIENCE3.0
Explores contemporary theory, research findings, clinical applications, and laboratory experiences in measurement and analysis of normal speech production. Speech subsystems of respiration, phonation, articulation, and resonation are examined in detail through the collection and analysis of physiologic data. Undergraduate credit only. (F) Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of B- in COMD 3100, 3400, and 3500. Must be admitted to the COMDDE major.
COMD 5100LANGUAGE SCIENCE (CI)3.0
Study of clinical analysis of syntactic and morphological properties of speech. Undergraduate credit only. Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the COMDDE major. (Sp)
COMD 5200LANGUAGE DX RX (0-5)3.0
Language assessment and intervention for children from birth to age five, including language sampling and analysis procedures, interpreting formal and informal testing, facilitating language through strategies and corresponding theories, planning clinical management and intervention, and enhancing emergent literacy. Undergraduate credit only. Prerequisite/Restriction: Minimum Grade of B- in COMD 2500, COMD 5100, or equivalent. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
COMD 5330AURAL REHABILITATION3.0
Ramifications of hearing loss for children and adults. Rehabilitative audiologic techniques and programs to improve communication of both children and adults who have hearing loss. Undergraduate credit only. Prerequisites: Minimum Grade of B- in COMD 3100 and COMD 3400. Must be admitted to the COMDDE major. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
COMD 5900INDEPENDENT STUDY1-6
Selected work individually assigned, handled, and directed. Problems of mutual interest to students and the instructor are investigated and reported. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 5900INDEPENDENT STUDY1.0
Selected work individually assigned, handled, and directed. Problems of mutual interest to students and the instructor are investigated and reported. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 5900INDEPENDENT STUDY2.0
Selected work individually assigned, handled, and directed. Problems of mutual interest to students and the instructor are investigated and reported. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 5920INTERPRETING II: LEGAL ISSUES3.0
A study of laws and court cases and their application to current practices and issues related to the interpreting profession. Code of ethics and professional conduct explored more in depth. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 6500STUDIES IN BLIND VISUAL IMPAIR3.0
Survey and discussion of studies of the learning characteristics and needs of children and youth who are blind or visually impaired (preschool through high school), the educational settings they are in, and the professionals who serve them. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 6520ANATOMY FUNC DISORDER OF EYE3.0
Covers structure and function of the human eye and visual system. Explores the most common eye conditions causing visual impairment in children and youth, as well as their implications and treatment. Examines the role of eye care specialists. With additional projects and readings, course goes beyond the information provided in undergraduate courses. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 6530ISSUES IN LOW VISION3.0
Investigates students having low vision. Explores methods of adapting materials, activities, and the environment to better meet their learning needs. Includes training in the use of low-vision aids, while exploring the role of professionals and their services. Continuation and expansion of the related undergraduate course, COMD 3330. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 6540VISUAL IMPAIR PARAEDUCATOR3.0
Examines the roles and responsibilities of paraeducators who work with children and youth who are blind or visually impaired in educational settings. Explores the role of the educational team and how team members can best include and utilize paraeducators as part of the team. Continuation and expansion of the related undergraduate course, COMD 3340. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 6550VISUAL LOSS WITH DIS3.0
Presents specific information about the impact of multiple disabilities on individuals having visual sensory losses. Covers neurological issues related to brain development and learning. Addresses communication issues and strategies for working with individuals who have multiple disabilities and sensory loss. Continuation and expansion of the related undergraduate course, COMD 3350. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 6560BRAILLE3.0
Online course open to graduate students. Explores braille literacy. Provides instruction in braille codes, software, and technology used to produce braille. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 6660INTRO TO DEAF-BLINDNESS4.0
Covers combined vision and hearing loss, as well as its impact on learning, communication, and overall development. Also explores neurological issues and other senses. Cross-listed as: COMD 4660. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 6730MULTIPLE DISABILITIES/SYNDROME2.0
Students will obtain a basic understanding of the problems and characteristics of children who have hearing loss plus one or more disabling conditions. Teaching strategies will also be discussed. Cross-listed as: COMD 5730. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring, Summer
COMD 6780SOCIO-CULTURE ASPECTS DEAF3.0
Leads students to understand how society, political institutions, and education have impacted the Deaf culture. Cross-listed as: COMD 4780. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
COMD 6840CHILD W VIS/HEAR/MD4.0
Designed to teach students how to implement appropriate intervention strategies for infants and young children (ages 0-3) related to communication, cognition, touch, play, self-care, orientation to the environment, etc., and how to help the family learn to communicate with their child. Prerequisite: COMD 4660/6660
COMD 6890ADD. ISSUES DEAFBLINDNESS4.0
This course will cover additional topics related to deafblindness including transition, health, mobility, and assesment. Graduate work requires an extra project. Prerequisite/Restriction: COMD 4660/COMD 6660 and COMD 4840/COMD 6840 Cross-listed as: COMD 4890 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 6900INDEPENDENT STUDY1.0
Prerequisite/Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
COMD 7520INTRO COCHLEAR IMPLANTS2.0
Provides an introduction to cochlear implant technology, including a history of cochlear implants, the development of cochlear implants, candidacy for cochlear implants, and outcomes for cochlear implant recipients. Audiology students should register for section 1, and nonaudiology students should register for section 2. Prerequisite/Restriction: Graduate standing in Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education Department. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Summer, Spring
CS 1030FOUNDATIONS OF CS (BPS)3.0
Investigation of computers and computing in today?s society, including the basic scientific and mathematical concepts that underlie computer science, computing, and computer systems. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ECE 5460VLSI DESIGN AUTOMATION3.0
Introduction to basic algorithms and methodologies for automating the design of modern VLSI circuits. Emphasis on physical design problems, including partitioning, floorplanning, and place and route of VLSI circuits. Identification and formulation of CAD design problems using algorithmic paradigms, such as simulated annealing, dynamic programming, and mathematical programming. Students gain experience in the development of VLSI-CAD tools. Prerequisites/Restrictions: CS 1400 and ECE 2700; Admittance to the Professional Engineering Program or Graduate Standing Cross-listed as: ECE 6560. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ECE 5630DIGITAL SIGNAL/IMAGE PROCESS3.0
Theory and applications of digital signal and image processing, including filter design, multi-rate processing, filter banks, array processing, and 2D systems, signals and transforms. Some lab and computational work required. Prerequisite/Restriction: ECE 3640 or equivalent. Not available to pre-majors. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ECE 5720COMPUTER SYS PROG AND ARCH3.0
Advanced assembly language and systems programming concerned with performance. Study of modern computer architecture issues, such as caching, pipelining, concurrent instruction execution, and virtual memory. Prerequisite/Restriction: ECE 2700 and Admission to the Professional Program or Graduate Standing. Co-requisite or prerequisite: ECE 3710 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ECE 5800ELECTROMAGNETICS II3.0
General plane wave solution of Maxwell's equations, potential functions, radiation, 2-D solution to Laplace's equation, and fundamental electromagnetic theory. Prerequisites/Restrictions: ECE 3870; Admittance to the Professional Engineering Program or Graduate Standing Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall
ECE 6010STOCHASTIC PROCESSES3.0
Introduction to stochastic processes in communications, signal processing, digital and computer systems, and control. Topics include continuous and discrete random processes, correlation and power spectral density, optimal filtering, Markov chains, and queuing theory. Prerequisite: Graduate status. (F)
ECE 6320LINEAR MULTIVARIABLE CONTROL3.0
Modeling, analysis, and design of multi-input, multi-output control systems, including both state space and transfer matrix approaches, with an emphasis on stability. Prerequisite/Restriction: ECE 5310 or MAE 5310. Cross-listed as: MAE 6320. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ECE 6460VLSI DESIGN AUTOMATION3.0
Introduction to basic algorithms and methodologies for automating the design of modern VLSI circuits. Emphasis on physical design problems, including partitioning, floorplanning, and place and route of VLSI circuits. Identification and formulation of CAD design problems using algorithmic paradigms, such as simulated annealing, dynamic programming, and mathematical programming. Students gain experience in the development of VLSI-CAD tools. Prerequisites: CS 1400 and ECE 2700 Cross-listed as: ECE 5460. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ECE 6800COLLOQUIUM0.5
Weekly seminars or colloquia. Students are normally required to enroll for two semesters. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ECN 1500INTRO ECON INSTITUTIONS (BAI)3.0
Designed to build an understanding of economic institutions, history, and principles. Relationship between private and public sectors of U.S. economy. Analysis of major economic institutions, such as property rights, markets, business organizations, labor unions, money and banking, trade, and taxation. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ECN 2010INTRO MICROECONOMICS (BSS)3.0
Designed to build an understanding of the economics of the marketplace from the perspectives of individual consumer and producer or business. Development and application of microeconomic principles to demonstrate the role and limitations of competitive markets in motivating socially efficient consumer, business, and public sector choices. Prerequisite/Restriction: ECN 1500 . Cross-listed as: APEC 2010 . Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ECN 3400INTRO GLOBAL ECON ENVIRON(DSS)3.0
Designed for future business leaders who want an understanding of the global economic environment in which businesses operate. Topics include global regulatory and political institutions, trade policy, and international capital and currency markets. Prerequisite/Restriction: ECN 2010/APEC 2010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ECN 4010INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS3.0
Analysis of behavior of consumers and business firms. Application of theory to the solution of real world problems. Prerequisite/Restriction: ECN 2010/APEC 2010, MATH 1100, and STAT 2300. Cross-listed as: APEC 4010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ECN 4020INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS3.0
Analysis of underlying causes of unemployment, economic instability, inflation, and economic growth. . Prerequisite/Restriction: ECN 1500 and MATH 1100 or MATH 1210 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ECN 4330APPLIED ECONOMETRICS (QI)3.0
Introduction to basic statistics, simple linear regression, multiple regression, and simultaneous equation models for economics. Prerequisite/Restriction: STAT 2000 or STAT 2300 or STAT 3000. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
ECN 5200MONEY AND BANKING3.0
Covers financial markets and the determination of interest rates and asset prices; the money supply process; the structure of the Federal Reserve System and the goals of the Federal Open Market Committee; other topical central banking issues; and the effects of monetary policy on output, interest rates, inflation, unemployment, financial markets, and exchange rates. Prerequisite/Restriction: ECN 4020. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
EDUC 6540DB DECISION MAKING SCHL LEADER3.0
Prepares prospective school leaders to conduct research, as well as to collect and analyze data for decision making and program evaluation in schools.
EDUC 6570INTRO ED/PSY RESEARCH3.0
Provides introduction to research methods, including identification of research problem, review and evaluation of research literature, and design and implementation of research project. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 2800. Cross-listed as: PSY 6570. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring, Fall
ELED 4000TEACHING SCIENCE/PRACT III3.0
Investigation and practical application of science programs, materials, and techniques of instruction for the teaching of science. Prerequisites: Minimum Level II GPA of 2.75; grade of B- or better in ELED 3000, ELED 3005, ELED 3100, SPED 4000, PSY 3660 and SPED 5530 or ITLS 4015. For Elementary Education program students not earning a dual certificate in Special Education, a B- or better is also required in ELED 4150. Admission to teacher education; completion of Level II and BIOL 1010 with a lab, or USU 1350; PHYS 1200 and GEO 1100 or their equivalents. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ELED 4040INSTR STRUGGLING READERS (CI)3.0
Prepares undergraduate students to use data from a variety of reading assessments to identify elementary student'? reading strengths and weaknesses and plan instruction. Special attention given to providing explicit differentiated reading instruction to meet the needs of students who struggle with learning to read. Prerequisite: Minimum Level II GPA of 2.75; grade of B- or better in ELED 3000, ELED 3005, ELED 3100, SPED 4000, PSY 3660, and SPED 5530 or ITLS 4015. For Elementary Education program students not earning a dual certificate in Special Education, a B- or better is also required in ELED 4150. Admission to teacher education, ELED 3100. Semester (s) Traditionally offered Fall and Spring
ELED 4050TEACHING SOC STUDIES/PRACT III3.0
Students develop necessary knowledge and skills to plan and implement an appropriate social studies program consistent with the nature of the child and our democratic society. Includes practicum work. Prerequisite: Minimum Level II GPA of 2.75; grade of B- or better in ELED 3000, ELED 3005, ELED 3100, SPED 4000, PSY 3660, and SPED 5530 or ITLS 4015. For Elementary Education program students not earning a dual certificate in Special Education, a B- or better is also required in ELED 4150.Admission to teacher education. Semester (s) Traditionally offered: Fall and Spring
ELED 4061TEACHING ELEMENTARY MATH I3.0
Development of pedagogical content knowledge in rational number, operations, and proportional reasoning for teaching grades preschool through grade 6. Understanding characteristics or instruction, assessment, and intervention will be considered critically. Prerequisites/Restrictions: MATH 1050 or higher mathematics class or AP Calculus AB score of 3 or higher and MATH 2010 or MATH 2020 Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall, Spring
ELED 4062TEACHING ELEMENTARY MATH II3.0
Development of pedagogical content knowledge in number, operations, and algebraic reasoning for teaching preschool to grade 6. Methods for designing and implementing mathematics instruction, assessment, remediation, and intervention will be applied in a field-based placement. Prerequisites/Restrictions: MATH 1050, MATH 2010, MATH 2020, and ELED 4061.
ELED 4480EARLY CHILDHOOD ED K-33.0
Study of early childhood (K-3) curriculum, methodology, and learning environments. Prerequisite: Admission to an Elementary Education program; grade of B- or better in ELED 1010 and FCHD 1500. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ELED 5250ADV CLSSRM MGMT STDNT TEACH3.0
Provides opportunities for student teachers/interns to learn about and practice skills in classroom management, curriculum development, instructional strategies, and lesson design and implementation in classroom contexts. Mentor teachers and University supervisors support context appropriate, effective teaching. Accompanies one of ELED 5050, ELED 5100, ELED 5150, or ELED 5200. Prerequisite: Minimum Level III GPA of 2.75; grade of B- or better in ELED 4000, ELED 4005, ELED 4030, ELED 4040, ELED 4050, and ELED 4060 Pass/Fail only. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ENGL 1010INTRO TO WRITING (CL1)3.0
Students learn skills and strategies for becoming successful academic readers, writers, and speakers: how to read and write critically, generate and develop ideas, work through multiple drafts, collaborate with peers, present ideas orally, and use computers as writing tools. (F,Sp,Su)
ENGL 1410ELEMENTS OF GRAMMAR3.0
Introduction to the study of the English sentence. Discussion of punctuation and usage to facilitate editing, as well as clarity and precision in writing. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ENGL 2010INTERM WRITING (CL2)3.0
Writing of reasoned academic argument supported with appropriately documented sources. Focuses on library and Internet research, evaluating and citing sources, oral presentations based on research, and collaboration. Prerequisite/Restriction: Fulfillment of Communications Literacy CL1 requirement through coursework (C- or better in ENGL 1010) or examination. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ENGL 2200UNDERSTANDING LIT (BHU)3.0
Introduction to fiction, drama, and poetry of different periods and cultures. (F,Sp,Su)
ENGL 2210INTRO TO FOLKLORE (BHU)3.0
Introduction to major genres of folklore (folk narrative, custom, folk music and song, vernacular architecture and arts), folk groups (regional, ethnic, occupational, familial), and basic folklore research methods (collecting and archiving). Cross-listed as: ANTH 2210 and HIST 2210. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ENGL 2600LITERARY ANALYSIS3.0
Writing-intensive course in literary analysis and research. Introduces English majors to techniques and problems of critical interpretation. Prerequisite/Restriction: Enrollment limited to English majors only. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ENGL 3030PERSPECTIVES IN LIT (DHA)3.0
In-depth study of literature for nonmajors. Topics vary according to faculty expertise. (F,Sp,Su)
ENGL 3080INTRO TO TECH COMM (CI)3.0
Introduces students to a variety of technical documents and improves their written and oral communication skills. Available to nonmajors as a technical communication service course. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of Communications Literacy CL2 requirement. (F,Sp)
ENGL 3520MULTICULTR AMER LIT3.0
Introduction to study of diverse literatures of the United States, including Native American, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, and African American. (F,Sp)
ENGL 3630FARM LITERATURE (CI)(DHA)3.0
English 3630, The Farm in Literature and Culture explore the "culture of agriculture." Students will read classical texts that provide a foundation to literature and other texts of the American farm as well as explore farming through the lens of art, architecture, folklore, popular culture, and genre.
ENGL 3710TOPICS IN FOLKLORE (CI)3.0
Issues, problems, and methodologies in folklore study. Focus and instructor variable. Cross-listed as: HIST 3710 and RELS 3710 and ANTH 3710. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
ENGL 6800TEACHING ONLINE3.0
Examination of principles and their implementation in online writing instruction. Emphasis placed on writing instruction within English departments. Cross-listed as: ENGL 7800. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall odd years
ENGL 7000EMPIRICAL RESEARCH METHODS3.0
Survey of empirical research methods for conducting professional communication research in academic and nonacademic settings Semesters Taught: Spring Even years
ENGL 7800TEACHING ONLINE3.0
Examination of principles and their implementation in online writing instruction. Emphasis placed on writing instruction within English departments. Cross-listed as: ENGL 6800. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall odd years
ENVS 3400FUND OF TOURISM3.0
Examines foundational concepts of the tourism and hospitality industry, emphasizing the significance, contexts, benefits, costs and other considerations related to tourism in Utah and the Intermountain West. Applies theory and research in planning, marketing, management, entrepreneurship and sustainable tourism development. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ENVS 3500QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT (QI)3.0
Overview of analytical and sampling methods used for collecting, organizing, and interpreting numeric data to evaluate problems and monitor conditions relating to relationships between environment and society. Prerequisites: STAT 2000 or 2300 or 3000; MATH 1050 or higher mathetmatics class or AP Calculus AB score of 3 or higher. (F)
ENVS 4000HUMAN DIM OF NR MGMT (DSS)3.0
Focuses on balancing science and social values in ecosystem management and decision-making. Topics include environmental justice, communication and behavior change strategies, landscape perception and attitudes, resource-dependent communities, public involvement, and conflict management. (F)
ENVS 4110HUMAN DIM WILDLIFE MGMT3.0
Examination of policy issues and administrative approaches in fish and wildlife management, with particular emphasis on nonbiological issues facing wildlife managers and administrators. Cross-listed as: ENVS 6110. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ENVS 4620APPLIC OF ENVIR EDUCATION4.0
Understanding and facilitating environmental education programming for persons working in education and public outreach settings. Students develop, evaluate, and improve environmental education programs and practices. Crosslist: ENVS 6620 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Summer
ENVS 6110HUMAN DIM WILDLIFE MGMT3.0
Examination of policy issues and administrative approaches in fish and wildlife management, with particular emphasis on nonbiological issues facing wildlife managers and administrators. Cross-listed as: ENVS 4110. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ENVS 6310INTRO TO ENVIRONMENTAL LAWS3.0
The course will focus on 16 Federal laws and policies protecting both our natural and cultural resources. These laws and policies were selected because they are most frequently encountered by natural resource managers and specialists. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ENVS 6530NR ADMINISTRATION3.0
Master of Natural Resources (MNR) degree requires students to complete courses in seven core areas. This course will satisfy the MNR's Administration requirement. Develops knowledge of issues, techniques, and practices for collaborative natural resource administration through assigned readings and discussions. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ENVS 6620APPLIC OF ENVIR EDUCATION4.0
Understanding and facilitating environmental education programming for persons working in education and public outreach settings. Students develop, evaluate, and improve environmental education programs and practices. Crosslist: ENVS 4620 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Summer
FCHD 1010BALANCING WORK/FAMILY (BSS)3.0
Introduces students to issues facing familes trying to balance work with family responsibilities. Examines integration of work and family across areas of marriage and family relationships, financial management, and child development and parenting. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
FCHD 1500HUMAN DEV LIFESPAN (BSS)3.0
Overview of human development across the lifespan, from conception to death. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
FCHD 2000CAREERS LIFE PLANNING IN FCHD3.0
Career planning specific to FCHD including Human Development, Family Relations, and Family Finance. Career options from faculty and recent graduate along with creating a plan to maximize college experience.
FCHD 2100FAMILY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT3.0
Explores the significance of values, goals, planning, and decision-making strategies in the development, management, and allocation of human, economic, and environmental resources. (F,Sp)
FCHD 2200INTRO WORKSHOP: FCHD1-12
Introductory workshop. Topics of discussion vary each semester. Repeatable for credit. Check with major department for limitations on number of credits that can be counted for graduation. (F, Sp, Su)
FCHD 2400MARRIAGE AND FAMILY REL (BSS)3.0
Overview of couple and family relationships, including marriage, child bearing and rearing, intergenerational relationships, and alternative family forms. (F,Sp)
FCHD 2660PARENTING AND CHILD GUIDAN(HR)3.0
Review of parenting styles and child guidance philosophies with emphasis on principles and techniques. Child abuse will also be reviewed. (F,Sp)
FCHD 3100ABUSE AND NEGLECT IN FAMILY3.0
Causes, treatment, and laws regarding family violence, including child abuse and neglect, partner abuse, and elder abuse. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, FCHD 1500, 2400. (F,Sp)
FCHD 3110HUMAN SEXUALITY3.0
Development and expression of human sexual values, attitudes, and behaviors in family and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: FCHD 1500, 2400; fulfillment of Communications Literacy CL2 requirement; and junior standing. (F)
FCHD 3130RESEARCH METHODS (QI)3.0
Common methodologies used in current family and human development research. Emphasis on becoming a knowledgeable and informed consumer of research. Enrollment limited to FCS and FCHD majors only. Prerequisite: STAT 1040 or STAT 1045. (F,Sp)
FCHD 3210FAMILY/CULTURAL DIVERSITY (CI)3.0
Similarities and differences in family patterns and functions in terms of race and ethnicity, gender, social class, and international development. Prerequisites: FCHD 1500, 2400, and fulfillment of Communications Literacy CL2 requirement. Enrollment limited to FCHD majors only. (F,Sp)
FCHD 3340HOUSING: SOC/ENVIRON ISSUES3.0
Studies housing in the contemporary U.S., including affordability, access, expectations, aesthetic considerations, and effects of public and private policies on housing choices. (F)
FCHD 3350FAMILY FINANCE (DSS)3.0
Overview of financial topics including financial goals, record keeping, budgeting, saving, insurance, taxes, use of credit, credit reports, mortgages, investments, retirement, fraud, and financial planning.
FCHD 3450CONSUMER CREDIT PROBLEMS3.0
Consumer credit problems, debt reduction strategies, credit collection policies and practices, bankruptcy, and government assistance programs. Prerequisite: FCHD 3350. (F)
FCHD 3500INFANT AND CHILDHOOD3.0
Development and growth of the child from conception to eight years. Physical, social, cognitive, and emotional growth; and parenting skills. Prerequisites: Junior standing and FCHD 1500 and FCHD 2660
FCHD 3540ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING3.0
Interdisciplinary perspective on developmental issues in adulthood and old age. Biosocial, cognitive, and psychosocial changes in older adults in family, community, cultural, and socio-political contexts. Prerequisite/Restriction: Junior standing and FCHD 1500. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
FCHD 3570YOUTH AND ADOLESCENCE3.0
Social, psychological, and physical aspects of childhood and adolescence in modern societies. Social and cultural expectations and influences on childhood and adolescents stemming from the family, peers, school, and the community. Prerequisites: Junior standing and FCHD 1500
FCHD 4220FAMILY CRISES/INTERVENTIONS3.0
Normative and nonnormative stressors provoking individual and family crises with emphasis on domestic violence. Principles and techniques for family interventions.
FCHD 4230FAMILY/SOCIAL POLICY3.0
Local, state, and federal policies with implications for individuals and families across the lifespan. Prerequisites: Junior standing and FCHD 2400. (F,Sp)
FCHD 4820METHODS FAMILY LIFE EDUCATORS3.0
Course focused on theory, principles, and skills necessary to prepare, present, and evaluate family life education programs and workshops. Prerequisite/Restriction:Enrollment limited to Family Life Studies majors. Campus: Online. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
FCHD 4830SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT3.0
Capstone course for the family life studies format. Prepares students as professionals, while providing professional development through research, teaching, and outreach. Development documented in portfolio, which is submitted and graded as the final senior project. Prerequisite/Restriction: Approval of advisor and instructor. Enrollment limited to Family Life Studies, Interdisciplinary Studies (FCHD) and General Studies (FCHD) majors. Campus: Online. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
FCHD 5250ADDICTIONS AND THE FAMILY3.0
Addictions have broad impact ont he family functioning, interpersonal relationships, and domestic violence. This course will cover a number of addictions as well as the specific impact on the marital and parent-child relationships. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall
FCHD 5550INTERDISCIPLINARY WORKSHOP3.0
Repeatable for credit. Check with major department for limitations on number of credits that can be counted for graduation. (F,Sp,Su)
FIN 3200FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT3.0
This course concetrates on developing tools that will be necessary for financial managers. It covers various topics such as time value of money, risk analysis, asset valuations, financial statement analysis, and financial markets and institutions. Prerequisites: ACCT 2010; MATH 1050 or higher mathematics class or AP Calculus AB score of 3 or higher; choose one statistics course from STAT 1040, STAT 2000, STAT 2300, STAT 3000, or PSY 3010, admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
FIN 3400CORPORATE FINANCE (QI)3.0
This course concentrates on decision making of financial managers and other professionals requried to make finance-related decisions in a contemporary business environment. Capital budgeting, firm valuation, capital structure and working capital management will be covered. Prerequisite/Restriction: FIN 3200, admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
FIN 4460INVESTMENTS3.0
Provides an understanding of security analysis and portfolio management. Market operations; risk and return; stock, bond, and option analysis; and portfolio theory and creation. Prerequisite/Restriction: Grade of B- (2.67) or better in FIN 3200; admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
GEO 1010INTRO TO GEOLOGY (BPS)3.0
Introduces plate tectonics, minerals, rocks, water resources, geological hazards, internal and external geologic processes, and a geologic history of the earth. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Summer
GEO 1380SCIENCE AND SOCIETY (BPS)3.0
This course explores various ways to counter the myth that science operates independently from society. Not only do the results of science ? knowledge and technology ? affect our social, cultural, and economic lives, but the practice of science is shaped by its social, cultural, and economic context. This course will build student?s scientific literacy and evaluation skills. Through the use of current issues in society and science, students will examine, analyze and evaluate the impact of the scientific issue on society (and vice versa). Semester Typically Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
GEO 3100NATURAL DISASTERS (DSC)3.0
Hazardous geologic processes affecting humans. Cause, prediction, avoidance, and frequency of natural disasters, including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, landslides, floods, subsidence, meteorite impacts, and global changes. Topics discussed in the context of earth systems and cycles. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: One Breadth Physical Sciences (BPS) course. (Sp)
GEO 3150ENERGY 21ST CENTURY (DSC)(QI)3.0
Provides science-based overview of energy resources. Compares and analyzes energy budgets and energy resources, including solar energy, fossil fuels, nuclear energy, and renewable sources. For the different energy sources, contrasts carbon emissions and potential impacts on climate change. Prerequisite/Restriction: USU 1360 and Quantitative Literacy (QL) course or equivalent. Cross-listed as: PHYS 3150 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
GEO 3300GEOLOGY OF WORLD'S OCEANS(DSC)3.0
Geologic evidence for the development of ocean basins and continental margins through plate tectonic processes. Also, the interaction of the geo- and biospheres and their effect on the evolution of the oceans and atmosphere. Discussion of shoreline and marine environments, the organisms inhabiting them, and the physical and chemical processes in operation therein. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite: One University Studies Breadth Physical Sciences (BPS) course. (Sp)
GEOG 1300WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY (BSS)3.0
Survey of world cultural regions, with an analysis of political, economic, and resource patterns in their physical setting. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
GEOG 4210GEOGRAPHY OF UTAH3.0
Applies principles and methods of physical, cultural, and human-environment geography to the study of Utah?s people, places, and environments. Includes opportunities to build skills in GIS mapping, field studies of biophysical and social phenomena, and other forms of geographic inquiry. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Summer
HEP 2500HEALTH AND WELLNESS2.0
Designed to enable students to enhance personal wellness by gaining understanding about the social, physical, spiritual, and emotional dimensions of health, and by applying different strategies for improving personal health behaviors. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
HEP 3000DRUGS AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR3.0
Students evaluate the historical and modern use, misuse, and abuse of drugs in relation to current concepts of physical, social, and emotional wellness. Special emphasis on educational and community strategies for prevention of drug-related problems. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
HEP 3200CONSUMER HEALTH3.0
Focuses on helping students become discriminating consumers of health information, health products, and health services. (F,Su)
HEP 3400STRESS MANAGEMENT3.0
Concepts and principles of personal stress management, with special emphasis on effective stress management coping strategies, maximizing positive stress outcomes, and minimizing negative stress effects, to aid in obtaining and maintaining a balanced health homeostatic condition. Campus: Online. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
HEP 3600INTRO COMMUNITY HEALTH (CI)3.0
Introduction to agencies, facilities, and programs playing a role in protection and promotion of health in the community. Special emphasis on competencies necessary for the health educator to function in a variety of community settings. Semesters Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
HEP 3700INTRO EPIDEMIOLOGY HLTH EDUC3.0
This class is an introductory epidemiology for students in health education. The primary goal for this class is to discuss fundamental knowledge and understandings of epidemiology as a health educator or health professional in the field. Prerequisite/Restriction: One of any statistics classes Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring, Fall
HEP 3800HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS3.0
The course reviews the history of how the U.S. health care system was developed and explores the complexities of various delivery systems including: providers, accessibility, quality of care, healthcare financing, insurance carriers, etc. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall
HEP 4600FIELD WORK IN HEALTH EDUC1-6
Supervised student participation in school or community health programs or directed projects. Prerequisite/Restriction: HEP 3600, HEP 4100,HEP 4200 and permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
HEP 4800HUMAN DISEASES3.0
The course explores the body systems and common diseases that afflict them. Risk factos are identified with a focus on risk reduction and the implementation of health promotion strategies in order to prevent or intervene in the disease process. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall, Spring
HEP 5000DIVERSE ISSUES IN HEALTH (CI)3.0
Focuses on how multicultural issues affect health status and health choices. Special emphasis on how race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender impact health status and access to health care. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Prerequisites: Junior standing, ENGL 2010, HEP 2500, HEP Majors or approval of instructor. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
HEP 5400STRAT OBESE/DISORDER EATING3.0
Promoting healthy behaviors using a "Health at Every Size" approach will be the primary goals of the course. Evidence-based programs for obesity and disordered eating prevention will be discussed. Additonally, students will discuss on issues related to obesity and disordered eating (e.g., weight stigma, media literacy, bullying). Prerequisite/Restriction: Junior standing for Undergraduate students, HEP majors only or approval of instructor Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring, Fall
HEP 6800HEALTH BEHAVIOR3.0
Explores current theoretical perspectives in relation to health behaviors. Students critically examine theories and models of health behavior. The focus is on the practical application of health behavior concepts in planning, implementing and evaluating health promotional interventions.
HIST 1060INTRO ISLAMIC CIV (BHU)3.0
Survey of Islamic civilization from the Prophet Muhammad to the present.
HIST 1100ANCIENT WESTERN CIV (BHU)3.0
Survey of institutions and developments of early and medieval Western civilization from its Mediterranean origins to the beginning of the early modern period. (F,Sp,Su)
HIST 1110MODERN WESTERN CIV (BHU)3.0
Survey of the institutions and developments in Western civilization from 1500 to the present. (F,Sp,Su)
HIST 1120LATIN/GREEK ELEMENT3.0
Survey of classical word roots in English, with a view to enhancing students' comprehension of English vocabulary and its Indo-European heritage. (F,Sp) Cross list: CLAS 1120
HIST 1500PRE-MODERN WORLD (BHU)3.0
Surveys pre-Nineteenth Century cultural and economic interactions in important zones of exchange. Regional focus determined by instructor. Themes may include: trade, religious conversion, migration, slavery, warfare, and other types of cross-cultural exchange. (F,Sp)
HIST 1510THE MODERN WORLD (BHU)3.0
Survey of world history from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
HIST 1700AMERICAN CIVILIZATION (BAI)3.0
Fundamentals of American civilization. Covers history, political system, and economic institutions of the United States. Fulfills American Institutions requirement. This course is also offered by online correspondence and/or CD through Continuing Education Time Enhanced Learning.
HIST 2210INTRO TO FOLKLORE (BHU)3.0
Introduction to major genres of folklore (folk narrative, custom, folk music and song, vernacular architecture and arts), folk groups (regional, ethnic, occupational, familial), and basic folklore research method (collecting and archiving). Cross-listed as: ANTH 2210 and ENGL 2210. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
HIST 2700US TO 1877 (BAI)3.0
Survey of the development of American society, economy, culture, and politics to 1877. (F,Sp,Su)
HIST 2710US 1877-PRESENT (BAI)3.0
Survey of the development of American society, economy, culture, and politics since 1877. (F,Sp,Su)
HIST 3000HISTORY RESEARCH METHODS3.0
This course is a foundational course for the History major. In it, students will learn to scan the historical literature; identify and articulate a researchable historical problem; find, synthesize and analyze the most relevant historical literature related to that research problem; and develop a research proposal that outlines the importance of the historical problem and the methods and primary sources that would apply to addressing that problem. Preparatory to HIST 4990. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall, Spring
HIST 3010INTRO TO BUDDHISM (DHA)3.0
General survey of historical development, basic doctrine, and practice of Hinayana and Mahayana Buddhism. Cross-listed as: RELS 3010.
HIST 3030INTRO TO ISLAM (DHA)3.0
This course will focus on understanding Islam through the examination of what Muslim jurists, theologians, exegetes and traditionalists think of their own traditions. This course will focus on the core beliefs, practices, scriptures and sentiments that have defined historically Muslim communities. In addition, the course aims to examine the spiritual dimensions, the theological discourses and the legal maxims of the Muslim traditions. Cross-listed as: RELS 3030 and ARBC 3030
HIST 3410MODERN MIDDLE EAST3.0
Examines history of the Middle East (Arabian peninsula, Fertile Crescent, Egypt, Iran, and Turkey), with special emphasis on social and political currents which have shaped the area's history.
HIST 3460COMPARATIVE ASIAN HISTORY3.0
Surveys history of Asian continent, analyzing common patterns in the cultures of West, South, Southeast, and East Asia.
HIST 3470RELIGION/POLITICS SOUTH ASIA3.0
This course offers an introduction to South Asian religio-political history combined with an examination of how religion and politics intersect in India and Pakistan, with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Cross list: RELS 3470
HIST 3710TOPICS IN FOLKLORE (CI)3.0
Issues, problems, and methodologies in folklore study. Focus and instructor variable. Also taught as ENGL 3710 and RELS 3710 and ANTH 3710. Repeatable for credit. Semester typically taught: Spring
HIST 3850HISTORY OF UTAH (DHA)(CI)3.0
Prehistory to the present. Examines environment and peoples of Utah, emphasizing use of primary documents to view and interpret Utah's past. Reading and writing intensive. Prerequisite/Restriction: Fulfillment of Communications Literacy CL2 requirement. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
HIST 4560WOMEN IN ISLAM (DHA)3.0
Within a religious and historical framework, it explores topics such as gender and social roles, women’s rights, veiling and dress, female circumcisions, arranged marriages, education, employment, parenting, honor killings, and politics in the lives of Islamic women. A basic knowledge of Islam is recommended before enrolling. Also taught as RELS 4560.
HIST 4600AMERI WEST TO 1900 (DHA)(CI)3.0
Traces major themes in nineteenth century history of the land between the Mississippi River and the Pacific Coast. In a writing intensive course, students use primary documents and secondary materials to discover the race, class, and gender issues that shaped the American West.
ITAL 1010ITALIAN FIRST YR I4.0
Communicative competencies in the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, with exposure to cultures and customs. Native speaker instructor. Self-study with tutorial assistance. (F)
ITAL 2010ITALIAN SECOND YR I4.0
Second-year overview of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, with exposure to cultures and customs. Native speaker instructor. Self-study with tutorial assistance. Prerequisite: ITAL 1020 or equivalent. (F)
ITLS 5105ELEARNING TOOLS3.0
Focuses on issues and methods of teaching and learning in distance education. Students develop strategies for effectively integrating technologies and facilitating learning at a distance. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 6105. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Summer
ITLS 5205COMPUTER APPL INSTR TRNG3.0
Introduction to use of computer applications, with special emphasis on software used in instruction and training. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 6205. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ITLS 5230INSTR GRAPHIC PROD I3.0
Fundamental practices of using the computer to design and produce a wide variety of instructional graphics. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 6230. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ITLS 5245INTERACTIVE MM PROD3.0
Covers fundamental programming concepts, in addition to fundamentals of the interactive multi-media environment. Students finishing this course will have at least one completed fully-functional project for their portfolios. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 6245. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring, Summer
ITLS 5265INTERNET DEVELOPMENT3.0
Teaches web publishing primarily using HTML (Hyper-Text Markup Language). Explores current web technologies and includes design, development, and evaluation. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 6265. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ITLS 5290MM PROD INSTR TRNG3.0
A guided independent study (capstone) culminating in a project featured in a portfolio. Students will develop a project of their own choosing, exploring advanced topics from prior work and/or learning emerging or new technologies. Project management and interface design covered. Prerequisite/Restriction:Must have completed at least two ITLS MM courses number 52XX or 62XX or Instructor Approval. Cross-listed as: ITLS 6290. P/F Only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ITLS 6105ELEARNING TOOLS3.0
Focuses on issues and methods of teaching and learning in distance education. Students develop strategies for effectively integrating technologies and facilitating learning at a distance. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 5105. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Summer
ITLS 6205COMPUTER APPL INSTR TRNG3.0
Introduction to use of computer applications, with special emphasis on software used in instruction and training. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 5205. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ITLS 6215DIGITAL VIDEO PROD I3.0
Fundamental theories and practice in design and development for camera and computer-based audio and video production, including recording, editing, and digitizing audio and video segments for education and training applications. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 5215. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Summer
ITLS 6230INSTR GRAPHIC PROD I3.0
Fundamental practices of using the computer to design and produce a wide variety of instructional graphics. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 5230. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
ITLS 6245INTERACTIVE MM PROD3.0
Covers fundamental programming concepts, in addition to fundamentals of the interactive multi-media environment. Students finishing this course will have at least one completed fully-functional project for their portfolios. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 5245. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring, Summer
ITLS 6265INTERNET DEVELOPMENT3.0
Teaches web publishing primarily using HTML (Hyper-Text Markup Language). Explores current web technologies and includes design, development, and evaluation. To receive graduate-level credit, students must fulfill additional requirements. Cross-listed as: ITLS 5265. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ITLS 6290MM PROD INSTR TRNG3.0
A guided independent study (capstone) culminating in a project featured in a portfolio. Students will develop a project of their own choosing, exploring advanced topics from prior work and/or learning emerging or new technologies. Project management and interface design covered. Prerequisite/Restriction:Must have completed at least two ITLS MM courses number 52XX or 62XX or Instructor Approval. Cross-listed as: ITLS 5290. P/F Only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
ITLS 6310ITLS FOUNDATIONS3.0
Explores foundations, history, perspectives, and literature in the field. Enables students to think more critically about their efforts and career goals. Prerequisite/Restriction: Matriculation into the ITLS department. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
ITLS 6390TRANSFORM TECHNOLOGY LEARNING3.0
Explores the critical role of technology as one tool in the transformation of education. Involves students in change-related projects in their local environment. Principles and practices of implementing innovations into real-world settings and evaluating their effectiveness. Prerequisite: ITLS 6540 and matriculation into the ITLS department or permission of instructor.
ITLS 6540LEARNING THEORY3.0
Detailed study of communication and learning theories as applied to the instructional design process. Examines principles and research upon which instructional design and instructional technology are based. Prerequisite: Matriculation into ITLS Department (F)
ITLS 6720INSTR IN ADULT EDUCATION3.0
Application of theory, principles, and practice of instructional technology in providing instruction to adult learners. (Su)
ITLS 6760GRANT WRITING3.0
Introduction to the many facets of grant writing. Students write a grant proposal for submission to a funding agency and reflectively critique other proposals. (Sp)
ITLS 6870CURRENT ISSUES SEMINAR3.0
Allows exploration of new cutting-edge topics in the field. Topics vary and are announced the semester prior to registration. Topics may be theory or practice based. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Arranged
KOR 3010KOREAN THIRD YR I4.0
Development of advanced reading, writing, and conversational skills. Prerequisite: KOR 2020 or equivalent. (F)
LAEP 1030INTRO LANDSCAPE ARCH (BCA)3.0
Environment as a basis for land use and design decisions. Topics discussed include environmental awareness, the planning and design process, and design related to open space, communities, and the region. Three one-hour lectures per week. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
LAEP 12002D GRAPHIC REPRESENTATION4.0
Graphic techniques for landscape architectural drawings emphasizing 2D black and white representation. Various media explored for preparing drawings and sketches for presentation, including CAD software. Two three-hour studios per week.
LAEP 2300HIST OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE3.0
An examination of landscape change in the context of its history from ancient to present times, with a primary emphasis on the visual qualities of designed landscapes. Three one-hour lectures per week. (Sp)
LAEP 3600LANDSCAPE MATERIALS2.0
Introduction to materials used in landscape design, including paving, walls, street furnishings, landscape lighting, decking, etc. Two one-hour lectures per week. (F)
LANG 3550CULTURE OF EAST ASIA (DHA)3.0
Helps students explore and appreciate the culture of three East Asian countries: China, Japan and Korea. Students gain sincere view and understanding of these East Asian cultures through readings, hands-on cultural activities, viewing video materials, writing, and discussions. Topics include: major historical and social events, customs and traditions, thoughts and beliefs, people, food, contemporary issues, art, literature, and film. Cross-listed as: ANTH 3550 and HIST 3550.
LATN 1010BEGINNING LATIN I5.0
Basics of Latin grammar and vocabulary. Beginning readings. (F)
LING 4100STUDY OF LANGUAGE3.0
Investigates ways in which human languages are structured, how they change, how they reflect the cultures in which they are used, and how they are learned. Cross-listed as: ANTH 4100. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring (Summer distance ed. only)
MATH 0995COLLEGE MATHEMATICS PREP4.0
Review of introductory algebra concepts. Topics include: manipulating and simplifying expressions; solving equations and inequalities; graphing equations and inequalities. Real world applications including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and radical functions. Math 0995 is a remedial class not carrying USU or transfer credit. Remedial fee required. Prerequisite/Restriction: One of the following within the last year or three consecutive semesters (including summer): ACT Math score of 16 or higher; SAT Math score of 400 or higher; or Grade of C- or better in MATH 0950; or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MATH 1050COLLEGE ALGEBRA (QL)4.0
Functions: graphs, transformations, combinations, and inverses. Polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions, and applications. Systems of equations and matrices. Partial fractions. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisite/Restriction: One of the following within the last year or three consecutive semesters (including summer); ACT Math score of at least 23; SAT Math score of at least 540; AP Calculus AB score of at least 3; Grade of C- or better in MATH 0995; or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MATH 1060TRIGONOMETRY2.0
Trigonometric functions, equations, identities, and applications. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisite/Restriction: One of the following within the last year or three consecutive semesters (including summer); ACT Math score of at least 23; SAT Math score of at least 540; AP Calculus AB score of at least 3; Grade of C or better in MATH 0995 or MATH 1050; or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MATH 1100CALCULUS TECHNIQUES (QL)3.0
Techniques of elementary calculus, differentiation, integration, elementary optimization, and introduction to partial derivatives. Applications in business, social science, and natural resources. Graphing calculator required. Prerequisite/Restriction: One of the following within the last year or three consecutive semesters (including summer); ACT Math score of at least 25; SAT Math score of at least 580; AP Calculus AB score of at least 3; Grade of C- or better in MATH 1050; or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 1050FOUNDATIONS OF BUS LEADERSHIP3.0
This academically rigorous course will serve as a platform to introduce students to the broad cross-section of disciplines that constitute the study of markets, commerce, and leadership while emphasizing ethical decision making throughout.
MGT 2050BUSINESS LAW2.0
Surveys the legal and ethical environment of business. Introduction to elementary legal research and writing and critical thinking techniques. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite/Restriction: GPA of 2.5 or higher. Students must complete 30 credit hours before they can take this class. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3000ENTREP: STARTING OWN BUSINESS3.0
This survey course examines all aspects of starting your own business. The course will explore opportunity recognition, marketing, finance, management, obtaining resources, developing a value network, operations, feasibility analysis and the start-up business plan. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits or permission of instructor. Credit will not be given for both MGT 3000 and MGT 3510. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3110MANAGING ORGANIZ/PEOPLE (DSS)3.0
Overview of the role of management, and an introduction to leadership theory and practice. Includes defining of mission and goals, organizing work, and managing human performance. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major; cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; and completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3250INTRO TO HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT3.0
Introduces the process of managing human resources, including human resource planning, recruitment, selection, training, performance evaluation, compensation, career management, labor relations, human resource strategy, and related ethical issues. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, and completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MGT 3500FUND OF MARKETING3.0
Overview of marketing function, emphasizing concepts and terminology. Includes basic marketing activities of product management, pricing, distribution, promotion, marketing research, and consumer behavior. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3510NEW VENTURE FUNDAMENTALS2.0
Introduction to entrepreneurship and the processes of new ventures. The objective is to help students become familiar with entrepreneurship and ascertain the degree to which it represents a viable career path. Focuses on identifying, analyzing, and developing business opportunities. Credit cannot also be earned for BUS 3610 or MGT 3000. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major; cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; and completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3520NEW VENTURE MANAGEMENT2.0
Development of the relationship and organizational competencies for entrepreneurs. Focuses on the development of persuasion, delegation, and organizational skills for individuals who launch businesses and/or play a key role in their growth. Credit will not be given for both MGT 3520 and BUS 3620. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major; cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; and completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3530NEW VENTURE MARKETING2.0
This course teaches students how to develop and build the brand for the new enterprise. Strategies for gaining customer intelligence are taught, with particular attention to primary and secondary marketing research. Effective low-cost marketing strategies are taught. Students are taught how to use ?the coin of the realm? to gain market presence for their ventures. Understanding and implementing social media in marketing and promotion of the opportunity will be learned in the course, as well as the role of traditional media: print, radio, television. This course will use well established research in marketing, strategy and psychology to support the tools, concepts and theory taught in the class. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3540NEW VENTURE FINANCING2.0
This course provides an overview of financial issues affecting entrepreneurial ventures. Emphasizes finance skills needed to develop the financial section of a business plan, make practical financial assessments of new business opportunities, and explore sources of new venture funding. Students will learn how to evaluate resource requirements, mobilize non-financial resources, develop strategies for bootstrapping and explore options for funding with debt and equity. The theory and tools of deal valuation will also be taught. Students will learn how to develop a resource and funding strategy, as well as cash and risk management. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major; cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; completion of at least 40 credits Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3560NEW VENTURE PLANNING2.0
Theoretical and practical aspects of starting or buying a business are taught in this class. This includes the development of a business plan, as well as conducting due diligence for buying a business or extensive consulting with a start-up or growth business. Students learn that entrepreneurial planning is an ongoing process that is centered upon organizational mission, vision, values and goals. As part of the instruction, students learn how to create an annual execution plan and a Personal Placement Memorandum (PPM). Credit cannot also be earned for BUS 4620. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher and completion of at least 40 credits Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3570NEW VENTURE SOC RESPONSIBILITY2.0
This course focuses upon social enterprises including ventures with a social mission, non-governmental-organizations (NGOs), and not-for-profit enterprises. Students learn about the growing interest in social entrepreneurship and why serving a broader purpose makes sense. Students learn how social venture business models differ from those of for-profit ventures. Theory underlying social capital, economics, micro venturing and philanthropy are taught in this course. Networking, governance, compliance, and business ethics are all examined. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3700OPERATIONS MGMT2.0
Covers the concepts and tools related to managing a business operation. Topics include operations strategy, process management, lean systems, supply chain management, demand forecasting, and inventory management. Prerequisite/Restriction: STAT 2000 or STAT 2300 or STAT 3000; admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3710TEAM MANAGEMENT2.0
Experientially-driven course focusing on the role of teams in organizations and on developing skills which individuals and teams need to be effective. Topics include self-awareness, supportive communication, problem solving, and conflict management. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major; cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; and completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MGT 3800LEADERSHIP2.0
This course fosters leadership development through a focus on integrity, authenticity, and commitment to a purpose higher than oneself. Students become more effective leaders by removing constraints and allowing leadership to emerge as natural self-expression. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
MGT 3820INTERNATIONAL MGMT (DSS)2.0
Exploration of international culture and context of management, the impact of globalization on businesses today, and the pressures and complexities of operating in global markets, including the processes of managing multi-cultural human resources. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major; cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; and completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MGT 3890SYSTEMS STRATEGY AND PROB SOLV2.0
This course examines the concepts, models, and procedures for identifying and addressing functional level problems and opportunities. The course examines the necessary coordination and synergy of functional units within a firm for optimal firm performance. Prerequisites: ACCT 2010, ACCT 2020, MIS 2100, MGT 2050, MGT 3500, MGT 3700, FIN 3400; admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 3900STRATGC MKTG HOSPITALTY & TRSM3.0
This course describes the nature and scope of career opportunities in hospitality and tourism. It provides an introduction to the language of hospitality and tourism management, describes how to identify, understand and segment target audiences, and discusses the role of customer relationship management in hospitality and tourism management. Students also learn how to design and implement effective marketing communications, use market research in hospitality and toursim mangement, and review and evaluate best practices in the hopsitality industry. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU Major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
MGT 3910REV & COST MGMT IN HSP & TRSM3.0
This course provides a foundation for managing revenues and costs in the hospitality and tourism industry. Students will learn how to analyze financial statements in the industry and how to effectively use them in strategic/tactical decision-making. Strategies for optimizing sustainable profitability will be explored. The course will rely upon simulations, role-playing, and cases to analyze trends and develop effective revenue management strategies. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU Major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
MGT 4510BUYER BEHAVIOR2.0
Marketing analysis of the decision processes of individuals, households, businesses, and not-for-profit institutions. Builds on concepts from psychology, sociology, anthropology, and economics. Prerequisite/Restriction: Grade of B- (2.67) or better in MGT 3500, any Breadth Social Sciences (BSS) course, admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring,
MGT 4530MARKETING RESEARCH3.0
Management of marketing research function. Basic vs. decisional research, survey research, cost vs. value of information, research design, experimentation, and analysis techniques. Prerequisite/Restriction: Grade of B- (2.67) or better MGT 3500; choose one of the following statistics courses: STAT 1040, STAT 1045, STAT 2300, STAT 3000, or PSY 2800; admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring,
MGT 4545DIGITAL MARKETING2.0
This course integrates the technological and managerial aspects of information technology with the business environment. Successful technology implementation efforts have to keep both technological and managerial perspectives in mind. Utilizing a combination of cases and technology, this course will examine the fit of technology into business and how its deployment changes interactions and processes within organizations, across organizations, within industries, and across society. Prerequisite/Restriction: B- or better in MGT 3500, admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MGT 4600NEGOTIATIONS2.0
This course is designed to teach the skills necessary to complete successful negotiations while maintaining both integrity and relationships. It is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of situations including candidate-employer negotiations, resolving conflicts and cross-cultural. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU Major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher; completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MGT 4790MANAGING GLOBAL VALUE CHAINS2.0
Examines strategies and tactics used to manage global supply chains. Topics include supply chain design, product development, strategic sourcing, information flow, and supply chain risk. Prerequisite/Restriction: Grade of B- (2.67) or better in MGT 3700; admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MGT 4890STATEGIC PLAN/EXECUTION (CI)3.0
Integrative capstone course dealing with challenges and strategies associated with international business. Students develop global business judgment and perspective through addressing problems related to global market entry and growth, finance, operations, strategic alliances, social responsibility, and business-government relationships. Prerequisite/Restriction: Senior standing; FIN 3400; MGT 3500, MGT 3700, MGT 3800; admittance to a USU major; cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 5730PROBLEM SOLVING/CONT IMPROVE0-3
Application of continuous improvement concepts, systems, and techniques throughout the organization. Analysis of contemporary methods of management and continuous improvement. Topics include: continuous flow, scientific thinking and the continuous improvement cycle, value stream mapping, root cause analysis, mistake proofing, and creative problem-solving. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 90 credits. (Prerequisites do not apply to students taking MGT 6730) Cross-listed as: MGT 6730 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MGT 6200NEGOTIATION FOR EXECUTIVES1-3
This course is designed to improve students' understanding and skills in all phases of negotiation, the development of negotiation strategy and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including dyadic, buyer-seller transactions, dispute resolution, cross-cultural and third-party. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 6330APPLIED HR RESEARCH3.0
This course addresses the application of research design in the workplace. Students explore research principles and strategies through completion of an applied HR research project. Specific attention is placed on focus group and survey research, statistical analysis, content analysis and skills for analyzing and reporting study results. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Summer
MGT 6500MANAGING INDIVIDUALS/GROUPS3.0
Focuses on development of interpersonal and team skills. Includes development of organizational systems supporting effective use of human resources, including performance management, motivation, selection, training, rewards, and career development. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
MGT 6550TALENT ACQUISTION AND RETNTION3.0
Focuses upon creation of competitive advantage through strategic human resources planning and staffing. Topics include job analysis, preparing candidate specifications, recruitment, assessment, and placement. Also covers pertinent laws/regulations and applicable descriptive/inferential statistics. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
MGT 6640TOPICS IN MGMT AND HR3.0
Selected topics in management and/or human resources are pursued in depth. Topics and instructor may vary. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MGT 6680HUMAN RESOURCE ANALYTICS3.0
This course focuses on the use of human capital and other business data for the purpose of describing, predicting, and improving business performance. Specific objectives include gaining a working knowledge of human resource information systems, learning to calculate ROI for HR programs, and developing and testing casual models of the linkages between human resource management practices and various business unit outcomes. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
MGT 6690HUMAN RESOURCE STRATEGY3.0
Capstone course in Human Resource Management, designed to integrate concepts learned in specialized courses to the management of a total Human Resource function, with integration from both strategic and tactical perspectives. Covers domestic and international issues, as well as organizational change and development. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
MGT 6890ADV STRATEGY3.0
Integrative capstone course, taking a CEO?s perspective, addressing global competitiveness, strategic assessment, policy development, and strategy execution. Prerequisite/Restriction: Must be taken at end of advanced MBA program. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MIS 2100PRINCIPLES OF MIS3.0
Covers principles of management information systems including how to use and manage information technology to improve business processes, improve decision making, and gain competitive advantage. Includes MIS concepts and vocabulary, as well as information technology. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MIS 3200BUSINESS COMMUNICATION(CI)3.0
CI Communications Intensive 3 credits Development and application of effective oral, interpersonal and written business communication skills using critical thinking skills to analyze business-related situations and apply appropriate communication frameworks. Polished communication skills will be fostered through various communication approaches and technologies. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits, and a grade of C or higher in ENGL 2010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MIS 3300BIG DATA ANALYTICS (QI)3.0
Provides an introduction to business intelligence and analytics, which includes the use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, exploratory and predictive models, and evidence-based methods to inform business decisions and actions. Prerequisites: C or better in MIS 2100 and either STAT 2300 or STAT 2000, admittance to a USU major, cumulative GPA of 2.67 or higher, completion of at least 40 credits. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
MIS 6110WORKSHOP3.0
Intensive workshops. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MIS 6230MANAGEMENT OF DATABASE SYSTEMS3.0
Theory and application of designing, developing, and maintaining database systems. Principles of management of data resources to support effective information systems in organizations. Prerequisite: ACCT 2010, FIN 3400, STAT 2300 and either MIS 3500 or CS 1400. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MUSC 1010INTRO TO MUSIC (BCA)3.0
Nontechnical course to develop understanding and enjoyment of music. Through study of musical elements, as well as historical, cultural, and social influences, an awareness of the relationship between techniques and aesthetic values in world music can be developed. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MUSC 1100FUND OF MUSIC-NONMAJOR (BCA)3.0
In-depth look at the basic elements of music: notes, rhythm, scales, intervals, key signatures, chords, cadences, and chord progressions. Includes basic ear training. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MUSC 3010MASTERPIECE OF MUSIC (DHA)3.0
Acquaints students with great masterpieces of music representing all periods of music history. Examines lives and times of various composers. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
MUSC 3020HISTORY OF JAZZ (DHA)3.0
Designed to give students an understanding of the development of jazz, popular music, and contemporary idioms, and their contributions to music and culture. (Sp)
MUSC 3030ROCK/ROLL CATALYST (DHA)(DSS)3.0
A study of the cultural, economic, social and political impact of rock and other popular music on social groups and movements around the world. Students will be challenged to consider how various types of music influence their own cultural perspectives. Prerequisites/Restrictions: Completion of CL and BSS Requirements Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
MUSC 3660OPERA BY CHILDREN3.0
Creative process of developing opera in a classroom for fine-arts and language-arts core instruction. Instruction in opera history, music, drama, art and dance elements, and necessary facilitation skills to build on individual's natural curiosity and creativity utilized in the process. (F,Sp,Su)
NDFS 1020SCI/APPL HUMAN NUTR (BLS)3.0
Role of dietary choices in providing nutrients and their relationship to the social, mental, and physical well-being of people. How to evaluate nutritional status with personal data using computer diet analysis program. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
NDFS 1030INTRO TO DIETETICS1.0
Overview of Registered Dietitian Nutritionist education pathways and requirements including: educational requirements and options for completion; requirements for acceptance to the Dietetics Programs at USU; requirements for Registration by the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR). Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall
NDFS 3600MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY2.0
Internet-based course teaches medical terminology by focusing on medical word-building rules, prefixes, suffixes, and whole-body terminology related to human body systems. Also includes coverage of anatomy, pathological conditions, and diagnostic treatments and procedures. (F,Sp)
NDFS 5320ADVANCED SPORTS NUTRITION3.0
A detailed exploration of the evidence-based theoretical and applied aspects of sports nutrition delivered in an interactive online format. Students will read and discuss current peer-reviewed articles and apply information learned to nutrition prescriptions for athletes. Cross listed: NDFS 6320 Prerequisites: NDFS 3020, 4020
NDFS 5800CNSEL/MOTIV INTRVW HLTH PRO3.0
This course is designed to provide in-depth counseling and motivational interviewing theories, concepts, and skill development for health care professionals. The course will rely heavily on practiced-based learning opportunities. Cross List: NDFS 6800 Prerequisites:NDFS 4060 for undergraduate students only. No prerequisites required for graduate students. Would prefer to limit the course to certain health related graduate degrees, if possible. For example, Masters of Dietetic Administration, Masters of Public Health, Masters of Science in Nutrition, Doctorate in Nutrition Science, Masters of Health Promotion.This course is designed to provide in-depth counseling and motivational interviewing theories, concepts, and skill development for health care professionals. The course will rely heavily on practiced-based learning opportunities.
NDFS 6750ADV DIETETICS PRACTICUM1-6
Advanced dietetics practicum in clinical nutrition, community nutrition, food service management, or research. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in final year in Coordinated Program in Dietetics (CPD) or Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD). Cross-listed as: NDFS 5750. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
NDFS 6770ADV MGMT IN DIETETICS I3.0
First of a two part series meant to refine principles of management in the three practice areas of dietetics (clinical, food service management, and community nutrition programs) with an emphasis on School Nutrition Program Management. Prerequisite/Restriction: Must be an MS candidate in dietetics or be eligible to take the national SFNS (School Food and Nutrition Service) exam. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
NDFS 6800CNSEL/MOTIV INTRVW HLTH PRO3.0
This course is designed to provide in-depth counseling and motivational interviewing theories, concepts, and skill development for health care professionals. The course will rely heavily on practiced-based learning opportunities. Cross List: NDFS 5800 Prerequisite: NDFS 4060 for undergraduate students only. No prerequisites required for graduate students. Would prefer to limit the course to certain health related graduate degrees, if possible. For example, Masters of Dietetic Administration, Masters of Public Health, Masters of Science in Nutrition, Doctorate in Nutrition Science, Masters of Health Promotion.
NDFS 6900SPECIAL PROBLEMS1-4
Individual problems and research problems for upper-division students in Nutrition and Food Sciences. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
NDFS 6970THESIS RESEARCH1-12
For students working on MS research. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
NDFS 7800SEMINAR1.0
Reports and discussion on research and current literature. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
NR 6600NR INTEGRATIVE EXPER1-6
Under the direction of the student?s supervisory committee, student completes an integrative capstone experience in his or her specialty. During their program of study, students not allowed to take this course for more than 6 credits. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
NR 6900DIRECTED STUDIES1-3
Offers credit for special assignments, readings, seminars, and symposiums beyond regularly scheduled courses. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
NR 6910GIS FOR NR APPLICATIONS3.0
This course is designed for graduate students who need an introduciton to GIS software and applications. Students will learn how to acquire geospatial data from various web sources as well as develop an understanding of how spatial data is created and collected in the field. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
OPDD 4420DIGITAL DESIGN TECHNOLOGIES I3.0
Using industry-standard software, students will apply creative and innovative problem-solving skills to outdoor product design. Students will create and develop design ideas using 3-D modeling software and the Adobe Creative Suite (specifically Adobe Illustrator). Prerequisites: TEE 1200 Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall
OPDD 4430DIGITAL DESIGN TECHNOLOGIES II3.0
Advanced application of skills learned in Digital Design Technologies I to the development of seamless print and logo design, tech-pack development and other applications that require Adobe Illustrator and 3-D modeling software. Prerequisites: OPDD 4420 Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Spring
PE 3000DYNAMIC FITNESS3.0
Designed to develop positive health practices in the areas of physical activity, diet, rest, and relaxation of living through classroom, laboratory, and activity experiences. Cross-listed as: PEP 3000 . Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PEP 2020INTRO PHYSICAL THERAPY2.0
Introduces prephysical therapy students to the discipline of physical therapy and familiarizes them with its associated spectrum of opportunities and responsibilities. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
PEP 2050SPORT RULES1.0
Knowledge of the rules and mechanics of officiating all Utah high school sports.
PEP 3100ATHLETIC INJURIES3.0
Care and prevention of common athletic injuries and standard taping techniques. Emphasizes recognition, first aid, and referral for these injuries. Taping techniques taught in a lab setting. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
PEP 3250ANATOMICAL KINESIOLOGY3.0
Study of the anatomical bases of human movement. Laboratory provides application of principles. Prerequisite/Restriction: BIOL 2320 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
PEP 4200BIOMECHANICS (QI)4.0
Understanding and application of human anatomical kinesiology and biomechanical principles fundamental to efficient human movement. In required concurrent one-hour lab, students obtain hands-on application of principles of anatomical kinesiology and biomechanics. Prerequisites: BIOL 2320, 2420, PEP 2000 or 2020; and MATH 1050 or STAT 1040 or STAT 1045 or higher or MATH ACT score of 25 or higher or SAT Math score of 580 or higher or AP Calculus AB score of 3 or higher.
PEP 4250ADV COOP WORK EXPER1-10
Cooperative education work experience offers student opportunity to work in related field work of the major. Prerequisite/Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PEP 4400EVALUATION IN PE (QI)3.0
Focuses on the nature and use of a variety of tests in physical education. Practical application, interpretation, and use of test results are stressed. Prerequisite/Restriction: PEP 2000 or PEP 2020 and enrollment in major within Health, Physical Education and Recreation Department. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
PEP 4500MOTIVATE STRAT PHYS ED COACH3.0
Addresses issues related to development of coaching philosophy, administration, and reviewing motivational strategies to develop and encourage positive behavior toward sport. Intrinsic motivation, goal setting, team building, and discipline discussed. Provides opportunity to work with local youth sports. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
PEP 5430HISTORY AND PHIL OF PE (CI)3.0
Designed to familiarize physical education majors (or nonmajors) with history of physical education and sport, as well as philosophical influences which have contributed to development of contemporary physical education and sport. Considers historical development of yesterday's pastimes into today's complex, institutionalized forms of sport and physical education. (F)
PEP 6430HIST AND PHILOSOPHY PE/SPORT3.0
History of physical education; philosophical influences which have contributed to contemporary physical education; and methods of educational instruction using the primary philosophical positions. (F)
PHIL 3600PHIL OF RELIGION (DHA)3.0
Problems in defining "religion" and the existence of God; the problem of evil; the immortality of the soul; religious experience; faith; alternatives to theism; religious language.
PHYS 2210PHYS SCI AND ENGR I (QI)(BPS)4.0
The study of motion and thermal physics including vectors, kinematics, forces, Newton’s three laws of motion, circular motion and rotations, harmonic motion, momentum, energy and work, gravity, fluids, and thermodynamics. Lecture and required recitation. Prerequisite/Restriction: MATH 1210 .
PHYS 2500INTRO COMPUTER METHODS PHYS2.0
Topics include: (1) use of numerical, graphical, and symbolic manipulation software to solve physics problems; and (2) interfacing computers to instrumentation for control and data acquisition. Prerequisite: PHYS 1800 or PHYS 2110 or PHYS 2210 or PHYS 2310
PHYS 3020GREAT SCIENTISTS (DSC)3.0
Lives and work of men and women responsible for scientific revolution: Maxwell (loved children), Einstein (despised authority), Curie (suffered discrimination against women), Schrodinger (fled from Hitler), Watson and Crick (the DNA story), Feynman (lock picker), Rubin (as a young girl built her own telescope), and others. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of University Studies Breadth Physical Sciences (BPS) or Breadth Life Sciences (BLS) requirement.
PHYS 3030THE UNIVERSE (DSC)(QI)3.0
Study of properties and origin of the universe, based on Einstein?s theory of gravity. Topics include curved space-time; black holes, white holes, and worm holes; the big bang; multiple universes; and the births of stars, galaxies, heavy atoms, and planets. Prerequisite/Restriction: Completion of University Studies Quantitative Literacy (QL) requirement and PHYS 1040.
POLS 1100US GOVT AND POLITICS (BAI)3.0
U.S. Constitution, political parties and elections, interest groups, Congress, president, bureaucracy, courts, and civil rights and liberties. This course meets the Americanization requirement. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
POLS 2200COMPARATIVE POLITICS (BSS)3.0
Comparisons of differences in political culture, institutions, and processes, including authoritarian and democratic systems, violence and corruption, political development, and public policy. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
POLS 2300INTRO TO POLITICAL THEORY3.0
A survey course covering ancient and modern political theory. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
POLS 3000INTRO POLITICAL RESEARCH (QI)3.0
Methodology, methods, and approaches used to study and analyze political events and relationships, including the use of library resources. Prerequisite: STAT 1040 or STAT 1045, MATH 1030 or MATH 1050. (F,Sp)
POLS 3150STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT3.0
Includes state and local politics, in addition to metro-urban politics.
POLS 3210WESTERN EUROPE GOVT/POL (DSS)3.0
Britain, France, Germany, Scandinavia, and the European Union.
POLS 3230MIDDLE EAST GOVT AND POLITICS3.0
General overview of political cultures and political developments in the Middle East. (F)
PSC 1800INTRO HORTICULTURE (BLS)3.0
Introduction to production of nursery, greenhouse, fruit, and vegetable crops. Explores residential and commercial landscape construction and management. Students also learn about interior plants, arboriculture, turf science, landscape plant materials, and home gardening. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
PSC 2600HERBACEOUS PLANT MATERIALS3.0
Identification, culture, and utilization of herbaceous ornamental plants in the landscape, including annual and perennial flowering plants, herbaceous ground covers, ornamental grasses, and herbs. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
PSC 2620WOODY PLANT MATERIALS3.0
Identification, culture, and utilization of woody ornamental plants in the landscape, including shade trees, flowering trees and shrubs, hedge plants, and vines. Review of native plants commonly used in the landscape. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
PSC 3000FUND OF SOIL SCIENCE4.0
Fundamentals of soil science, emphasizing physical, chemical, mineralogical, and biological properties of soils, and how these properties relate to plant growth and environmental quality. Prerequisite/Restriction: CHEM 1110 or higher and MATH 1050 or higher Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
PSC 4810CLIMATE CHANGE (DSC)(QI)3.0
Emphasizes physical basis of climate (climate dynamics), as well as the mechanisms and processes for its fluctuations on sub-seasonal to interannual time scales (climate variations) and on regional to hemispheric/global time scales. Prerequisites/Restrictions: GEOG 1000 Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Spring
PSC 5090SUSTAIN LOW WATER LANDSCAPING3.0
The course will focus on environmental analysis of climate, water, and soils of a prospective landscape site to inform the design process on selection of adapted plants and plant layout that will minimize irrigation water use and maintenance. Also taught at LAEP 5090/9060, PSC 6090
PSC 6090SUSTAIN LOW WATER LANDSCAPING3.0
The course will focus on environmental analysis of climate, water, and soils of a prospective landscape site to inform the design process on selection of adapted plants and plant layout that will minimize irrigation water use and maintenance. Also taught at LAEP 5090/9060, PSC 5090
PSC 6230READINGS IN WATER CONSERV2.0
Background topics in water development and policy in the West. Current topics on various aspects of water conservation in urban landscapes. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
PSC 6240WATER EFFICIENT LNDSCP SEMINAR1.0
Students develop skills in public speaking by presenting their summer internship experience to the Plants, Soils, and Climate faculty. Students also work on a culminating academic endeavor for the program. (F)
PSY 1010GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (BSS)3.0
Explores basic areas of psychology, and how each explains human thought and behavior at the individual, familial, and cultural levels. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 1100LIFESPAN DEVELOPMENT3.0
Covers theories and stages of development across the life span. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
PSY 1400ANALYSIS BEHAVIOR: BASIC3.0
A laboratory course about the scientific methods used in the study of animal and human behavior. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 1410ANALYSIS BEHAVIOR: BASIC LAB1.0
Laboratory experience accompanying PSY 1400. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 2010ORIENTATION TO PSY2.0
Overview of the field and major. Students clarify career goals, identify steps necessary to achieve goals, prepare a vita, and gain major-relevant skills (e.g., APA-style writing, ethics, and library usage). Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010 and consent of Psychology Advising Office. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 2100DEVELOPMENTAL PSY: ADOLESCENCE3.0
Characteristics of adolescents and their psychological, educational, and adjustment problems are discussed in detail. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring Odd Years
PSY 2250INTRO COOP WORK EXPER3.0
Educators and employers cooperate to provide opportunities for students to apply classroom theory and principles in job environments, thereby gaining practical experience in their field. Prerequisite/Restriction: Approval of Psychology Department coop education counselor. Repeatable for credit Pass/Fail only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 3010PSYCHOLOGICAL STAT (QI)4.0
An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics for the behavioral sciences. Topics include measures of central tendency and variability, sampling distributions, and hypothesis testing procedures including t-tests, analysis of variance, and correlation and regression. Prerequisite/Restriction: STAT 1040 or STAT 1045 Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 3110HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY3.0
Introduction to ?biopsychosocial model? of health and well-being. Focuses on reciprocal interactions among biological, psychological, and social factors in human functioning and disease. Explores cultural approaches to health, illness, and treatment. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring Odd Years
PSY 3120ABUSE AND NEGLECT (DSS)3.0
Focuses primarily on child maltreatment and neglect. Course covers historical, legal, medical, and psychological approaches to causes, consequences, and interventions for child maltreatment and neglect. Literatures concerning animal abuse, dating, domestic violence, and abuse of the elderly may be covered. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Summer Online Only
PSY 3210ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY (DSS)3.0
Introduction to ?abnormal? human behavior. Covers characteristics, etiology, and treatment of a variety of psychological disorders. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
PSY 3400ANALYSIS BEHAVIOR: ADV (DSS)4.0
In-depth examination of principles introduced in PSY 1400. Considers principles governing more complex human and animal behavior, as well as emotional and motivational factors in behavior. Lab included as part of credit. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1400 and PSY 1410. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
PSY 3460NEUROSCIENCE I3.0
Introductory course examining relationship between central nervous system anatomy and physiology in controlling behavior and emotional functioning. Also considers neural and biochemical substrates of behavior. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
PSY 3460NEUROSCIENCE I4.0
Introductory course examining relationship between central nervous system anatomy and physiology in controlling behavior and emotional functioning. Also considers neural and biochemical substrates of behavior. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
PSY 3500RESEARCH METH IN PSY (DSS)(CI)3.0
Comprehensive introduction to research methods in psychological science. Students will understand, analyze, and evaluate existing research and develop their own research proposal. Content includes: defining and measuring variables; selecting research participants; application of different research designs; and conducting ethical research. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010 and ENGL 2010 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 3510SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (DSS)3.0
Study of the individual in society; problems, theories, and methods of social psychology; will relate reading assignments to current social issues. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. (F)
PSY 4210PERSONALITY THEORY (DSS)3.0
Explanatory study of various personality theories, their origin, and approaches to the understanding of human behavior. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010 and PSY 2800. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
PSY 4230PSYCHOLOGY OF GENDER (DSS)3.0
Critical analysis of evidence for sex differences, gender roles, the effect of gender on traditional psychology, and other topics, including parenthood, cultural influence, and sexual orientation. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring Even Years
PSY 4240MULTICULTURAL PSY (DSS)3.0
Explores cultural influences on basic psychological processes, including perception, cognition, language, emotion, intelligence, attitudes, values, and intergroup relations. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. (F)
PSY 4250ADV COOP WORK EXPER1-12
Cooperative education work experience position; increased level of complexity and a more professional level of experience as student advances toward completion of the program. Prerequisite/Restriction: Approval of Psychology Department cooperative education coordinator. Repeatable for credit Pass/Fail only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 4250ADV COOP WORK EXPER3.0
Cooperative education work experience position; increased level of complexity and a more professional level of experience as student advances toward completion of the program. Prerequisite/Restriction: Approval of Psychology Department cooperative education coordinator. Repeatable for credit Pass/Fail only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 4420COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (DSS)3.0
In-depth study of basic concepts, methods, and theories involved in perception, memory, and thinking. Lab required. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. (Sp)
PSY 4430COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY LAB1.0
Required laboratory, designed to accompany PSY 4420. Focuses on conducting cognitive experiments via computer simulations and sampling data collection. Designed to increase skills in designing data collection and interpreting experimental data. (Sp)
PSY 4910URCO1-3
A cooperative process of discovery, investigation, research, or creativity between faculty and one or more students. Prerequisite/Restriction: Approval of Psychology Department URCO coordinator. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 4920PRACTICUM1-3
Field work in applied psychological setting at BS level. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 4950UNDERGRAD APPRENTICESHIP (CI)3.0
Students plan and execute their apprenticeship experience in a research setting (with faculty members) and an applied setting (e.g., community service agency or school). Students are encouraged to take this course three or more semesters prior to graduation. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 2010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 5100HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSY3.0
Theoretical and historical developments in psychology with primary emphasis on nineteenth and twentieth century developments, although earlier precursors are also considered. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. (Sp)
PSY 5200INTRO INTERVIEW/COUNSEL (CI)3.0
Theory, models, and practice in basic principles of interviewing and counseling, including listening skills, facilitation of verbal interaction, gathering information, attending to nonverbal behavior, interpersonal dynamics, and promoting helping relationships. Prerequisites: Psychology major or minor, matriculation in master's program requiring PSY 5200, or consent of instructor. (F)
PSY 5330PSY MEASUREMENT & TEST THEORY3.0
This course covers psychological test and measurement theories, including statistical theories for defining reliability and validity. It also dicusses the application of psychometric theory to psychological scale development and evaluation. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010 and PSY 3010 Cross-listed as: PSY 6330 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
PSY 5500INTERDISCIPLINARY WORKSHOP1-3
Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 5900INDEPENDENT STUDY1-3
Individual discussion and intensive study of a particular problem or area. Prerequisite/Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 5910INDEPENDENT RESEARCH1-3
Experiments and demonstration projects are conducted and reported. Prerequisite/Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 5930INSTR APPRENTICESHIP1-3
Didactic and applied experience in course preparation and instructional techniques applicable to the teaching of psychology. Intended for students planning careers as instructors at the secondary and postsecondary levels. Prerequisite/Restriction: Permission of instructor. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
PSY 6100HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSY3.0
Theoretical and historical developments in psychology with primary emphasis on nineteenth and twentieth century developments, although earlier precursors are also considered. Prerequisite: PSY 1010. (Sp)
PSY 6260CAREER DEV SCH COUNSEL2.0
Designed for students who plan to license for and enter professional school counseling, this course provides an opportunity for exploration of career patterns and factors influencing career development and effectiveness. Prerequisite/Restriction: Admission to the Professional School Counselor Education program, or approval by the program director Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Summer
PSY 6330PSY MEASUREMENT & TEST THEORY3.0
This course covers psychological test and measurement theories, including statistical theories for defining reliability and validity. It also dicusses the application of psychometric theory to psychological scale development and evaluation. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 1010 and PSY 3010 Cross-listed as: PSY 5330 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
PSY 6570INTRO ED/PSY RESEARCH3.0
Provides introduction to research methods, including identification of research problem, review and evaluation of research literature, and design and implementation of research project. Prerequisite/Restriction: PSY 2800. Cross-listed as: EDUC 6570. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring, Fall
PSY 6700GRANT WRITING SCH COUNSELORS2.0
Guided experience in preparation of grant proposals, with emphasis on funding sources for K-12 schools. Students write mock grant proposal sections for submission to funding agencies to support school initiatives. Prerequisites: Admission to School Counselor Education Program or instructor approval. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Summer
REH 1010DISABILITY AND SOCIETY (BSS)3.0
Discussion of definitions and types of disabilities, ethical issues, society?s prejudice and discrimination against people with disabilities, and the individual?s adjustment to the disability experience. Disability as a natural part of life. Cross-listed as: SPED 1010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
RELS 1010INTRO RELIGIOUS STUDIES (BHU)3.0
Historical and comparative survey of the principal beliefs and practices of the world's religions, as well as an exploration of their interplay with the cultures in which they exist. Following general introduction to the study of religion, course includes units on Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese and Japanese Religions, Islam, Judaism, Christianity, and the "new religions" in America.
RELS 2060RELIGION AND SCIENCE3.0
This course is a historical study of the relationship between religion and science. We explore evolving definitions of science and religion, important figures during the early modern period, and the emergence of modern science and religion in the 19th-20th centuries. Semester Taught: Spring
RELS 3010INTRO TO BUDDHISM (DHA)3.0
General survey of historical development, basic doctrine, and practice of Hinayana and Mahayana Buddhism. Cross-listed as: HIST 3010.
RELS 3030INTRO TO ISLAM (DHA)3.0
This course will focus on understanding Islam through the examination of what Muslim jurists, theologians, exegetes and traditionalists think of their own traditions. This course will focus on the core beliefs, practices, scriptures and sentiments that have defined historically Muslim communities. In addition, the course aims to examine the spiritual dimensions, the theological discourses and the legal maxims of the Muslim traditions. Also taught as ARBC 3030 and HIST 3030.
RELS 3060INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM (DHA)3.0
This course provides a multidisciplinary survey of Judaism, from its Biblical origins to modern times, including an introduction to its sacred texts, religious practices, and social dimensions. Semester(s) Traditionally Taught: Fall, Spring
RELS 3470RELIGION/POLITICS SOUTH ASIA3.0
This course offers an introduction to South Asian religio-political history combined with an examination of how religion and politics intersect in India and Pakistan, with a focus on the 19th and 20th centuries. Cross list: HIST 3470
RELS 4560WOMEN IN ISLAM (DHA)3.0
Within a religious and historical framework, it explores topics such as gender and social roles, women?s rights, veiling and dress, female circumcisions, arranged marriages, education, employment, parenting, honor killings, and politics in the lives of Islamic women. A basic knowledge of Islam is recommended before enrolling. Cross-listed as: HIST 4560
SCED 3210ED/MULTICULTR FOUND (DSS)(CI)3.0
Provides preservice teachers with the opportunity to critically examine the political, economic, and educational policies influencing students' access to equitable educational experiences. Examines historical and philosophical foundations influencing the nature of multicultural education in our democratic society, how personal biases can influence instructional practices, and development of multicultural curriculum relevant to specific content areas. Prerequisite/Restriction: Program Admission Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
SCED 6270INTRO METHOD/PLAN/ASSMNT/TECH4.0
As one of the pedagogical knowledge requirements for the Alternative Route to Secondary Licensure, this course introduces new teachers to effective teaching methods. Teachers learn how to integrate research-based teaching methods, formal and informal assessments, and technology into their lessons. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
SCED 6555PRACT IMPROVE INSTRUCT SEMINAR1.0
To meet the requirements of the Alternative Route to Secondary Licensure program, students should take this practicum during fall semester and then again during spring semester. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
SOC 1010INTRO SOCIOLOGY (BSS)3.0
Examination of social behavior of humans and social institutions. Theories and methods for studying society and social issues, along with insights from related disciplines. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
SOC 1020SOCIAL PROBLEMS (BSS)3.0
Study of major U.S. and international social problems. Examination of how issues are defined as social problems and ways groups attempt to solve the problems. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
SOC 3120SOCIAL STATISTICS I (QI)3.0
Examines use of statistics in social sciences. Particular focus on use of statistical analysis with surveys and census-type data. Includes parametric and nonparametric statistics utilized most in social analysis. Prerequisites: Completion of 6 credits in departmental courses and grade of "C-" or better in STAT 1040 or STAT 1045 or equivalent. (F,Sp,Su)
SOC 3200POPULATION AND SOCIETY (DSS)3.0
Examination of interrelationships between population change and social structure in national and international context. Examines contributions of fertility, mortality, and migration to population characteristics, particularly sex, age, and ethnic composition. Stresses demographic data and analysis. (F,Sp)
SOC 3410JUVENILE DELINQUENCY3.0
Focuses on nature, extent, and causes of delinquent behavior. Examines workings of juvenile justice system and programs for delinquency prevention. (F,Sp)
SOC 3420CRIMINOLOGY3.0
Examines theoretical explanations for crime in the U.S. Describes characteristics of major forms of criminal behavior. (F,Sp)
SOC 3610RURAL PEOPLE AND PLACES (DSS)3.0
Examines rural life and social change in the U.S. and around the world. Considers how rural people and places connect to broader society at regional, national, and global scales. Explores demographic, economic, political, social, and environmental conditions of rural communities.
SOC 3750SOCIOLOGY OF AGING3.0
Examination of social context in which aging occurs, the social implications of aging, and attendant social policy issues. Considers both individual and societal aging, using an historical and global approach. (F)
SOC 4800SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY3.0
Seminars in various areas of sociology: (a) theory, (b) methodology, (c) demography, (d) social organization, (e) social deviance, (f) social psychology, (g) human ecology, (h) gerontology. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
SPAN 3040ADV SPANISH GRAMMAR3.0
Intense review of selected problematic areas of Spanish grammar for students with advanced language skills. Prerequisite/Restriction: SPAN 2020 (or equivalent coursework) or placement in this specific class by examination. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring (Summer distance ed. only)
SPAN 3550SPANISH CULTURE AND CIV (DHA)3.0
Historical, social, political, economic, and cultural conditions and institutions of Spain. Prerequisites/Restrictions: SPAN 2020 or demonstration of equivalent proficiency through testing Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring (Summer distance ed. only)
SPAN 3570LATIN AMERICAN CULTR/CIV (DHA)3.0
A thematic approach to Hispanic American cultures and civilization. Individual course sections may focus alternately on topics such as Contemporary Art, Cinema, Popular Music, Cuisine, Dictatorship and Democracy, Globalization, Popular Resistance, Human Rights, Exile and/or Immigration. Course may be repeated as the content changes. Prerequisite/Restriction: SPAN 2020 or demonstration of equivalent proficiency through testing Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring (Summer distance ed. only)
SPAN 3610SURVEY OF SPANISH LIT II (DHA)3.0
Selective readings and discussions of major works and authors in Spanish literature from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries. Prerequisite/Restriction: SPAN 3300 or permission of the instructor. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring (Summer distance ed. only)
SPAN 3630SURVEY HISPA AMER LIT II (DHA)3.0
Selective readings and discussion of major works and authors in Hispanic American literature from the Wars of Independence (1810) through contemporary literary production. Prerequisite/Restriction: SPAN 3300 or permission of the instructor. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
SPED 1010SOCIETY AND DISABILITY (BSS)3.0
Discussion of definitions and types of disabilities, ethical issues, society?s prejudice and discrimination against people with disabilities, and the individual?s adjustment to the disability experience. Disability as a natural part of life. Cross-listed as: REH 1010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
SPED 4000EDUC OF EXCEPTIONAL INDV2.0
Characteristics of all types of exceptional children with emphasis on the educational and psychological implications of these conditions to the development of the child. (F,Sp,Su)
SPED 4910URCO1-4
Individually directed study at the undergraduate level. Prerequisite/Restriction: Permission of instructor required. Repeatable for credit. Pass/Fail only. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
SPED 5510CURRICULUM SEVERE DISABILITIES4.0
Provides information about commercially available curricular materials, as well as how to plan for and design functional academic curricula, for persons with severe disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission to Special Education major or permission of instructor. (F)
SPED 5520CURRICULUM SEC SEVERE DIS3.0
Provides information on developing and implementing secondary-level classroom, community, domestic, leisure, and transition instructional programs. Prerequisite: Admission to Special Education major or permission of instructor. (Sp)
SPED 5600PRACT: INSTR ACADEMIC SKILLS3.0
A field-based class providing experience in observing and teaching functional academic curricula to students with severe disabilities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (F)
SPED 5610PRACT: INSTR DAILY LIVING4.0
Provides opportunity to assess students' needs and to design programs for community, domestic, leisure, and transitional skills. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (Sp)
SPED 5790SPECIAL TOPICS1.0
Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
STAT 1040INTRO TO STATISTICS (QL)3.0
Descriptive and inferential statistical methods. Emphasis on conceptual understanding and statistical thinking. Examples presented from many different areas. Prerequisite/Restriction: One of the following within the last year or three consecutive semesters (including summer); ACT Math score of 19 or higher; SAT Math score of 460 or higher; AP Calculus AB score of at least 3; Grade of C- or better in MATH 0995; Grade of C- or better in MATH 1050 or MATH 1100; or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
STAT 1045INTRO STAT WITH ALGEBRA (QL)5.0
Intro to statistics with an emphasis on conceptual understanding and statistical reasoning. Foundational algebra, types of studies, summarizing data, probability, hypothesis testing. NOTE: This course does NOT meet the prerequisites for MATH 1050. Prerequisite/Restriction: One of the following within the last year or three consecutive semesters (including summer): ACT Math score of 16 or higher; SAT Math score of 400 or higher; or Grade of C- or better in MATH 0950 or satisfactory score on the MATH Placement Exam. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
STAT 2000STATISTICAL METHODS (QI)4.0
Introduction to statistical concepts, graphical techniques, probability, distributions, estimation, one and two sample testing, chi-square tests, and simple linear regression, one-way ANOVA. Prerequisite/Restriction: One of the following within the last year or three consecutive semesters (including summer); ACT Math score of at least 25; SAT Math score of at least 580; Grade of C- or better in MATH 1050 or MATH 1100; or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
STAT 2300BUSINESS STATISTICS (QL)4.0
Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability, sampling, estimation, tests of hypotheses, linear regression and correlation, chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and multiple regression. Prerequisite/Restriction: One of the following within the last year or three consecutive semesters (including summer); ACT Math score of at least 25; SAT Math score of at least 580; Grade of C- or better in MATH 1050 or MATH 1100; or satisfactory score on the Math Placement Exam. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
STAT 3000STATISTICS FOR SCIENTISTS (QI)3.0
Introduction to statistical concepts, graphical techniques, discrete and continuous distributions, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, and chi-square tests. Prerequisite/Restriction: C- or better in MATH 1100 or MATH 1210. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
SW 2100BEHAVIOR IN SOC ENVIRON3.0
Interrelatedness of social, cultural, and environmental factors that combine with biological and psychological components to mold human behavior. Relevance of these factors to generalist social work practice. Prerequisite: SW 1010. (Sp)
SW 2400SW W/DIVERSE POPULATIONS3.0
Examines characteristics of various populations, including patterns, dynamics, and consequences of discrimination, economic deprivation, and oppression. Emphasis placed on empowerment of groups and individuals, as well as the accumulation of multicultural competence. Prerequisite: SW 1010. (Sp)
SW 3360ADOLESCENTS3.0
Focuses on major social problems confronting youth today: teenage pregnancy, substance abuse, unemployment, education, and mental health. Investigation of theories explaining these problems and society's efforts to resolve these problems. Prerequisites: SW 1010, 2400, 2100.
SW 3850SPIRITUALITY AND SOCIAL WORK3.0
Provides a framework of knowledge, values, skills, and experiences for spiritually sensitive social work practice. Prerequisite/Restriction: SW 1010. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
SW 6500ADV CHILD WELFARE PRACTICE3.0
Provides overview of services provided to abused/neglected children and their families, with emphasis on rural contexts. Explores assessment and treatment of problems commonly experienced by child welfare populations. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
SW 6800LAW AND ETHICS FOR SW3.0
Provides students with basic understanding of law and ethics within the context of social work practice, including legal rights of individuals, legal processes, the legal system, and ethical dilemmas and issues. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Summer
TEAL 3660EDUCATIONAL PSYCH FOR TEACHERS2.0
Principles and practices for development of conditions for effective learning. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education Semester Taught: Fall, Spring
TEAL 5560SPECIAL TOPICS3.0
Field-based program focusing upon characteristics of effective teaching methodologies, teaching performance, curriculum decision making, value guidelines, and the characteristics of the learner. May be graded with a letter grade or graded as Pass/Fail, as determined by the instructor. Cross-listed as: TEAL 6560 and EDUC 5560/EDUC 6560. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
TEAL 6050THEORIES INSTR SUPERVISION3.0
Principles and theoretical base of supervision as they relate to improving instructional practices. Emphasizes research findings and recommended practices. Differentiated syllabi provided between master's and doctoral versions.
TEAL 6060IL: ASSMNT CURR ACCNTABILTY3.0
This course will introduce prospective school leaders to instructional leadership practices in a climate of accountability for curriculum results using various assessment tools and approaches. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring, Summer
TEAL 6080LEADERSHIP AND SCHL PRINCIPAL3.0
Focuses on the school principalship. Provides an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the principal, with emphasis placed on understanding leadership and instructional leadership. Introduces students to knowledge, dispositions, and skills required of successful school principals. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
TEAL 6090THEORY ORGANIZE LEADRSHIP EDUC3.0
Introduces prospective school administrators to theories of organizational behavior and practices of managing and leading people within the context of the school organization. Differentiated syllabi provided between master?s and doctoral versions. Cross-listed as: TEAL 7090. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Summer, Fall
TEAL 6235INSTRUCTIONAL OF LITERACY DEV3.0
This course is designed to provide teachers with an instructional framework for understanding literacy acquisition for K-12 students. Teachers will increase their knowledge and skill in applying instructional practices that support students' literacy learning. Prerequisite: Undergraduate Degree
TEAL 6280IL: INSTR PR FOR DIVERSE LRNRS3.0
This course will engage prospective school leaders to learn and evaluate evidence based academics and behavioral instructional methods to improve, diverse, user outcomes.
TEAL 6300WORKSHOP MATH EDUCATION1.0
Exploration of current topics and methods in mathematics education. In the past, topics have included: Common Core mathematics content, relevant mathematics in rural settings, integration of mathematics and children's literature. Prerequisite: Bachelor's Degree or Equivalent Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
TEAL 6300WORKSHOP MATH EDUCATION2.0
Exploration of current topics and methods in mathematics education. In the past, topics have included: Common Core mathematics content, relevant mathematics in rural settings, integration of mathematics and children's literature. Prerequisite: Bachelor's Degree or Equivalent Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
TEAL 6300WORKSHOP MATH EDUCATION3.0
Exploration of current topics and methods in mathematics education. In the past, topics have included: Common Core mathematics content, relevant mathematics in rural settings, integration of mathematics and children's literature. Prerequisite: Bachelor's Degree or Equivalent Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
TEAL 6390TCHING W LIT & INFORMTNL TXTS3.0
This course focuses on selecting literature and informational texts to support standards-based language arts and content area instruction. The course will focus on strategies for strengthening students' comprehension of these texts, buliding academic language through reading these texts, and selecting from a wide range of texts including those that represent the wide range of cultures and ethnicities in U.S. schools. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Summer
TEAL 6410SOCIAL FNDTNS OF EDUCATION3.0
Examines current educational issues and trends within contexts of history, philosophy, and cultural foundations. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
TEAL 6500SCHOOL FINANCE RESOURCE MGT3.0
Focuses on generating, allocating, and managing revenues and resources for public schools. Emphasizes law and policy regarding Utah school finance. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring, Summer
TEAL 6521MATH K-8 NUMBERS/OPERATIONS3.0
This course, for K-8 teachers, will cover the content of Number and Operations to develop comprehensive understanding of our number system and relate its structure to computation, arithmetic, algebra, and problem solving. Prerequisite/Restriction: Bachelors Degree in Elementary Education or Equivalent Cross-listed as: EMTH 5030 and TEPD 5521 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
TEAL 6522MATH K-8 RATIONAL NUMBERS3.0
To provide practicing teachers a deeper understanding of rational numbers, operations with rational numbers, and proportionality, and instructional strategies to facilitate the instruction of this content for elementary students. Prerequisite/Restriction: Bachelors Degree in Elementary Education or equivalent Cross-listed as: EMTH 5040 and TEPD 5522 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
TEAL 6523MATH K-8 ALGEBRAIC REASONING3.0
To provide practicing teachers a deeper understanding of algebraic expressions, equations, functions, real numbers, and instructional strategies to facilitate the instruction of this content for elementary students. Prerequisite/Restriction: Bachelors Degree in Elementary Education or equivalent Cross-listed as: EMTH 5050 and TEPD 5523 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
TEAL 6524GEOM AND MEAS FOR K-8 TEACHERS3.0
To provide practicing teachers a deeper understanding of the geometry and measurement context that exists in the state core and instructional strategies to facilitate the instruction of this content. Prerequisite/Restriction: Bachelors Degree in Elementary Education or equivalent Cross-listed as: EMTH 5060 and TEPD 5524 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
TEAL 6525DATA ANALYSIS FOR K-8 TEACHER3.0
This course will provide practicing teachers a deeper understanding of probability and data representation and analysis. Prerequisite/Restriction: Bachelors Degree in Elementary Education or equivalent Cross-listed as: EMTH 5070 and TEPD 5525 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Summer
TEAL 6551MATH ED K-8: ASSMNT/INTERVENT3.0
To provide practicing teachers a deeper understanding of the various types of assessment and their appropriate use for guiding instruction, intervention and evaluation of student learning. Prerequisite/Restriction: Bachelor's degree in Elementary Education or equivalent Cross-List: TEPD 5551 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Summer
TEAL 6740SCHOOL LAW3.0
Acquaints students with legal issues relating to public education. Considers rights and responsibilities of students, teachers, and educational practitioners. Relates these rights to school programs and operations as determined by state and federal laws and court decisions. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Summer
TEAL 6930SUPRVSN/ADMIN INTERN SEMINAR2.0
Jointly (with TEAL 6940 ) provides experience (minimum 250 hours) in supervision and administration in elementary and secondary school settings as they relate to the performances of the six Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) Standards for School Leaders. Registration includes weekly seminar. Pass/Fail only. Campus: Main campus and RCDE Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
TEAL 6940SUPRVSN/ADMINISTRATIVE INTERN1-4
Jointly (with TEAL 6930 ) provides experience (minimum 200 hours) in supervision and administration in elementary and secondary school settings as they relate to the performances of the six Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) Standards for School Leaders. Repeatable for credit Pass/Fail only. Campus: Main campus and RCDE Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
TEAL 6945SUPRVSN/ADMINISTRATION INTERN3.0
Provides experience in supervision and administration in school systems. (F,Sp,Su)
TEAL 7050THEORIES INSTR SUPERVISION3.0
Principles and theoretical base of supervision as they relate to improving instructional practices. Emphasizes research findings and recommended practices. Differentiated syllabi provided between master's and doctoral versions. (F,Su)
TEAL 7090THEORY ORGANIZE LEADRSHIP EDUC3.0
Introduces prospective school administrators to theories of organizational behavior and practices of managing and leading people within the context of the school organization. Differentiated syllabi provided between master?s and doctoral versions. Cross-listed as: TEAL 6090. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Summer, Fall
TEE 1020EPT SYSTEMS CONTROL TECHNOLOGY3.0
Exploration of the concepts and processes relating to the control and automation (both hard and programmable) of technical systems in the areas of energy and power, transportation, and agricultural and related biotechnologies. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
TEE 1200CAD AND DESIGN3.0
Provides students with ability to accurately produce basic engineering, 2-D, and pictorial drawings using traditional and computer-aided drafting techniques. Introduction to drafting fundamentals and equipment associated with the drafting industry, including drawings, reproductions, and computer-aided techniques. (F,Sp,Su)
TEE 5220PROGRAM/COURSE DEV (CI)3.0
Review of basic principles and practices of curriculum and course development used in applied technology and technology education. Emphasizes components needed to develop a curriculum guide. Prerequisites: TEE 3200, 3300. (Sp)
TEE 6090PROGRAM DESIGN3.0
Study of contemporary program design and development in technology and engineering education and career and technical education. Reviews complete curriculum developmental process. (F,Sp,Su) Cross List: ASTE 6090
THEA 3330DRAMA FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS3.0
Theory and practice of drama pedagogy for pre-service educators, emphasizing methods for incorporating drama into their classroom teaching. Distance sites must meet minimum enrollment of three students per site. Prerequisite/Restriction: Not open to Theatre Arts Majors or Minors Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
THEA 4320STORYTELLING IN EDUCATION(DHA)3.0
Theory and practice of storytelling in educational settings. Devising and performance of stories with and for young people, storytelling through puppetry, integration of storytelling across the curriculum. For graduate credit students must complete additional teaching, research, and/or service. Prerequisite/Restriction: Sophomore-level or above Cross-listed as: THEA 6320 Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
USU 1220CAREER AND LIFE PLANNING3.0
Students assess and clarify their interests, values, skills, and temperaments. Emphasizes discovering relationships between these personal characteristics and the realities of educational and employment opportunities. Explores setting goals, creating action plans, and coping with change. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
USU 1300US INSTITUTIONS (BAI)3.0
Provides basic understanding of the history, principles, form of government, and economic system of the United States. Emphasis on ideas and critical thinking, rather than dates, names, and places. (F,Sp,Su)
USU 1320CIV: HUMANITIES (BHU)3.0
Provides basic understanding of a broad range of themes, which cut across human history and continue to be important in contemporary society. (F,Sp,Su)
USU 1330CIV: CREATIVE ARTS (BCA)3.0
Students will explore questions such as: What is Art? How is it judged? How does artistic expression vary across cultures? Course will cover several forms of art, and students will attend concerts, visit galleries, and attend theatrical performances. (F,Sp,Su)
USU 1730STRATEGIES ACADEMIC SUCCESS3.0
Orients students to the systems, tools, and resources unique to higher education that are needed to maximize academic success (e.g., library, computer lab use, etc.). Also helps students develop critical thinking, study, and learning strategies necessary for college success.
USU 7920TEACHING ASSISTANT WORKSHOP0.0
This course will provide graduate students? with training on FERPA, sexual harassment prevention, and working with students with disabilities as well as cover Utah State University policies and procedures relevant to teaching assistants. The course will also introduce students to university resources that may be helpful to teaching assistants.
WGS 1010INTRO WOMEN/GENDER STDY (BSS)3.0
Survey course covering fundamentals of women and gender studies. Explores women?s and men?s diverse experiences, perspectives, and contributions to society and its institutions. Examines cultural beliefs and stereotypes concerning women?s and men?s roles in society. Reviews feminist theory, socialization, ideology, and history of women?s movement. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Spring
WGS 3010WOMEN AND LEADERSHIP (CI)3.0
This class will cover the components of feminist leadership and the issues and challenges of intersectionality, self-silencing, and self-efficacy relative to feminist leadership. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
WILD 2200ECOLOGY OF OUR WORLD (BLS)3.0
Foundations of ecological and evolutionary relationships of organisms with other organisms and with the physical environment, emphasizing populations, communities, and ecosystems. Integration of basic science with applications of science to understanding human interactions with the environment. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring
WILD 4750MONITOR/ASSMNT IN NR4.0
Lectures, laboratory exercises, and field-based projects introduce students to the concepts, strategies, and analytical methods of natural resource and environmental monitoring and assessment. Prerequisite/Restriction: BIOL 1620 and BIOL 2220 or WATS 2220 and MATH 1100 or MATH 1210; STAT 2000 or STAT 3000; and a prerequisite or co-requisite of WILD 3810. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
WILD 4950SPECIAL TOPICS1.0
Individual study and research upon selected problems. Prerequisite/Restriction: Departmental permission. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
WILD 6400ECOLOGY OF ANIMAL POPULATIONS3.0
Growth, fluctuation, balance, and control of animal populations. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall
WILD 6900GRAD SPECIAL TOPICS1.0
Offers credit for special assignments, reading, and seminars beyond regularly scheduled courses. Repeatable for credit. Semester(s) Traditionally Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer

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